Fat Joe Hits Back At Critics Over BET Hip Hop Awards Hosting: "This Black & Brown Unity"

Naysayers complained about a non-Black host, but Fat Joe emphasized that throughout his career, he's always been about "Black and Brown together."

BYErika Marie
Paras Griffin / Stringer / Getty Images

This October, we'll once again be celebrating the culture at the BET Hip Hop Awards. It was recently announced that Fat Joe would be this year's host at the coveted event, making this one a ceremony that fans won't want to miss. However, there has been a little bit of pushback over the Bronx emcee acting as the award show's master of ceremonies, and it is something that Joe doesn't want to entertain.

Some social media users took to their favorite platforms to complain about a non-Black person being hired for the gig, but to Fat Joe, Hip Hop has always been about uniting people together.


The Rap icon reportedly caught up Jazmyn Summers of iHeart Radio and EURWeb Spotlight to address his upcoming hosting opportunity as well as the buzzing controversy.

“It finally happened and I am so honored and excited,” said Joe. “As far as me, it’s always been about Black and Brown unity. As soon as we realize that we all are one, that’s when we’ll become stronger in numbers. So when you hear Big Pun‘s first single 'Boricua Morena,' we been steady preaching this Black and Brown unity. Support Black-owned businesses, and Brown-owned businesses. Support your kids. Support your people out there."

“Go out there and influence them. Go out there and inspire them because our people – Black and Brown together – need that little push.”

Amid his BET Hip Hop Awards news, it was also announced that Joe and Sean "Diddy" Combs were slated to develop a new series that may find the "Lean Back" rapper interviewing his peers—this time, away from Livestream. 

Do you think Fat Joe was a good choice as a host?

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About The Author
Erika Marie is a seasoned journalist, editor, and ghostwriter who works predominantly in the fields of music, spirituality, mental health advocacy, and social activism. The Los Angeles editor, storyteller, and activist has been involved in the behind-the-scenes workings of the entertainment industry for nearly two decades. E.M. attempts to write stories that are compelling while remaining informative and respectful. She's an advocate of lyrical witticism & the power of the pen. Favorites: Motown, New Jack Swing, '90s R&B, Hip Hop, Indie Rock, & Punk; Funk, Soul, Harlem Renaissance Jazz greats, and artists who innovate, not simply replicate.