Soulja No Swiping: 6 Times Soulja Boy Stole Another Rapper's Flow

BYMatt Aceto38.0K Views
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A brief history of Soulja Boy's swagger-jacking.

After much investigation, it has been confirmed: Soulja Boy is a swag-jacker. Some may say this is stating the obvious, as Soulja Boy has been incorporating other rappers’ flows into his music for many years. Just by simply typing in "Soulja Boy stole flow" on Twitter’s search bar, you can find dozens of accusations aimed at the "Crank That" rapper for swagger-jacking. However, not until recently, did it become truly apparent. In the past few months alone, Soulja has been called-out for stealing the flows of Big Sean, Future, and Young Thug; but the list goes deeper than that. Dating back to 2011, scroll through the gallery above to unveil six occurrences where Soulja stole another rapper’s flow. Got 'em!


Song: Soulja Boy - Tear It Up

Soulja No Swiping: 6 Times Soulja Boy Stole Another Rapper's Flow

Victim: HBK of Doughboyz Cashout

Soulja Boy’s most notable swagger-jacking accusation came in 2011, for his song "Tear It Up." When the music video debuted on WorldStar, users ripped him apart for using the flow from "Good Ass Day" by Doughboyz Cashout rapper HBK. In the video below, the two songs are compared, along with a response from the Doughboyz crew. What do you think, did Soulja steal HBK’s flow?

Song: Soulja Boy - Teach Me How To Cook

Soulja No Swiping: 6 Times Soulja Boy Stole Another Rapper's Flow

Victim: Lil B

Soulja Boy and Lil B released a collaborative mixtape titled Pretty Boy Millionaires back in 2010, and since then, Soulja hasn’t hid his appreciation for The Based God. Soulja’s "Teach Me How To Cook" video, uploaded to YouTube in May 2012, directly uses Lil B’s "Whoop" ad-lib and trademark cooking dance. Compare it to "Wonton Soup" below; is Soulja a master chef?

Song: Soulja Boy - Cuban Link

Soulja No Swiping: 6 Times Soulja Boy Stole Another Rapper's Flow

Victim: Future

Future’s "Karate Chop" was one of the most hype records of 2013. His choppy flow, arguably popularized by Lil Reese, caught the attention of many listeners, including Soulja Boy. Months after Future dropped the infamous "Karate Chop (Remix)" featuring Lil Wayne, Soulja released "Cuban Link," and the similarities became very obvious. Compare "Cuban Link" to "Karate Chop" below.

Song: Soulja Boy - Red Bottoms & Balenciaga

Soulja No Swiping: 6 Times Soulja Boy Stole Another Rapper's Flow

Victim: Chief Keef

Since the inception of his career, Chief Keef has been one of the most mimicked artists in all of hip-hop. (He touches upon this on his Sorry 4 The Weight track, “What Up”). His flows have been borrowed by many rappers, but none as blatantly as Soulja Boy. Keef’s signature "aye" ad-lib, which he adopted from his deceased uncle, can be found in "Red Bottoms & Balenciaga" by Soulja Boy. Listen below as Soulja repeatedly says "aye" after each bar, similar to Chief Keef’s flow on "Make It Count."

Song: Soulja Boy - Super Dope

Soulja No Swiping: 6 Times Soulja Boy Stole Another Rapper's Flow

Victim: Young Thug

This swagger jack was especially noticeable. Right around the time Young Thug was becoming nationally popular, Soulja Boy dropped "Super Dope," a melodic, helium-voiced banger loaded with ad-libs. Even some of Thugger’s signature phrases, "Eww" and "Lean, lean, lean!" are woven into the song. Compare "Super Dope" to Thug’s "Rich Nigga Shit" below.

Song: Soulja Boy - Whippin’ My Wrist

Soulja No Swiping: 6 Times Soulja Boy Stole Another Rapper's Flow

Victim: Big Sean

Based on our user rating of 87%, “Whippin My Wrist” is Soulja Boy’s hottest song of 2015. The fiery track features Soulja rapping in double-time, skillfully handling the explosive beat. However, users quickly pointed out that he stole Big Sean’s "Paradise" flow, while others argue he jacked Cap-1’s flow. Listen to "Whippin My Wrist" and "Paradise" below, do you see the resemblance?

About The Author
<b>Contributor</b> Matt is a young writer/entrepreneur, with dreams of becoming the industry's premier hip-hop journalist. His passion for rap music intensified after hearing Lil Wayne's classic 2009 mixtape, No Ceilings. A pensive thinker, Matt is not only attentive to the music, but concerned with hip-hop culture as a whole. His favorite sub-genres of hip-hop include Atlanta "trap" and Chicago "drill".