Bow Wow is a rapper who is no stranger to courting controversy when it comes to interacting with his fans (well, let's use the term loosely) on social media. There was a September incident where he totally fell for an Iggy Azalea thirst trap session, commenting on a video of the female artist by saying, "I swear id eat her 👅🍑NO PROBLEM! Idgaf 😂." As if that weren't enough, he also got clowned by fans after he posted a video of himself letting loose at a nightclub, clutching an empty bottle of Ciroc the entire time. The comment section was once again full with people who wanted to know not only if he could actually afford an entire bottle, but also why he continued to seem so fake while flexing. Today, Bow Wow shared part of his backstory when it comes to his hip-hop upbringing, posts that once again elicited a divided reaction from fans.

Moss shared a photo that was supposedly sent to him by a fan, with his image inserted into the famous photo spread of the entire Death Row lineup. The picture was originally taken back in the mid-1990's, after Tupac Shakur had moved to the label. Bow Wow tweeted a curious message along with the photograph:

He also shared some other photographic memories from his time sharing the same room as some Death Row legends, such as Suge Knight and Snoop Dogg. Although he was affiliated with the Doggfather - even making an appearance in the "Gin and Juice" video when it dropped in 1993 - Bow Wow never released any studio work under the label's umbrella while it was still in business. There's no mention of his name anywhere online insofar as official Death Row artists, but then again, with Knight's penchant for making deals unofficial (read: not written down on paper), I suppose there could be some grey area.

Some fans actually backed up what Moss was saying, alleging that being discovered by Snoop sort of made him an honorary member of the label's family, before he upped sticks and started making records with Jermaine Dupri, among others.

However, there's never been a Bow Wow Twitter thread that the Internet didn't immediately mine for comedic material, and this instance is no exception to the rule. Behold, as Moss takes what you might say is another L, if these social media users are to be taken as the voices of reason.