Murda Beatz is living his best life. Although the sun was melting away the resolve of the thousands that came to see Murda spin at Coachella, they were visually energetic for his set to begin. Massive wavy 4K screens painted the backdrop for the stage. The smell of weed smoke permeated the air, a twisted mix of blunt, joint, and vape pen fumes. Murda Beatz stepped on stage and soaked up the energy of the desert and its vigorous occupants, and delivered.

For a man of 25 years old, Murda Beatz has a mountain of bangers already under his belt. It was dizzying to hear him shuffle through the hits he produced, and the momentum only multiplied as his set continued. For weekend one, Murda Beatz brought out Rich the Kid and A$AP Ferg to get the crowd hype. Although Rich brings an animated energy with him, Ferg had the crowd on another level of madness. Unfortunately, I was not present for his set on weekend two of Coachella, when Murda brought the legend DMX out. There aren't many young souls in hip-hop that understand the balance between the traditional and the modern. Rich the Kid and Ferg represent the new. DMX represents the history, the principles of hip-hop. Murda brought them together, over two weekends, for a Coachella crowd that was comprised of hip-hop heads from multiple generations. Murda understands how to reach different demographics, and that may be why his success has been so compelling.

Photo Credit: Bryan Chong

Before Murda Beatz took the stage for his weekend two performance at Coachella, we spoke with him about his influences, his personal favorite beats and producers, who he would like to work with next, and more. 


HotNewHipHop: Is this your first time at Coachella?

Murda Beatz: It's my third time being here, but it's my first time performing, I'm blessed.

You’re from Fort Erie, Ontario, what is the music scene there like? Is there a plethora of hip-hop culture or were you raised around a more eclectic range of music?

There's not much local talent. Mostly rock bands are the local talent. Hardcore, metal, from the generation of our parents. Not really many hip-hop references. I grew up with a rock background, RIP my father, he put me on to rock music. My friends put me on to rap, at that age when you're a teen. I found 50 Cent, Eminem, and all that shit. And I just liked the beats.

You prefer FL Studio, why?

FL gang all day. Fruity loops, I don't know, it's the first thing I found. My boys taught me how to crack it, and I cracked it. I started out trash, but I worked at it every day. To me it's the easiest program. Other people who use Logic, or whatever, they think FL is the hardest but I don't understand that.

You began making beats around 16-17 years old, what influenced you to produce instead of rap or sing?

I was a drummer, it was an easy crossover. It was kinda me doing the same thing. The drummer makes the beat in hip-hop yeah? So I went from playing the drums to making beats.

Who are your top 3 producers?

Number 1 Lex Luger. That's what influenced me to get into trap music. Timbaland. Boi-1da, of course.

You have an apprenticeship type relationship with Boi-1da, how did that come about?

I'm not scared to ask questions. a lot of people put their pride first, and they're scared to ask questions. That's how people get blocked. With Boi-1da, I asked him a lot of questions, chilling with him, cooking up with him, I can learn off people. I just asked him a lot of questions about how to do everything.

What are your top 3 favorite beats? 

"Hate It Or Love It," "Trap House" by Gucci, and "848" by Jim Jones. "848" was produced by Southside. The producers who made the MGK song ("Wild Boys"), stole it from Southside and Jim Jones. It was their song first. 

What are your personal favorite beats you have produced?

"Nice For What," "Motorsport," and  "FEFE."
Who are some people you would like to work with that you have not yet? 

Rihanna, Beyonce, and Justin Beiber.

Oh, you want to make pop music?

I want to make everything. I can do anything.

Photo Credit: Bryan Chong