Last week, Brooklyn Nets Guard, Kyrie Irving, was condemned for making an antisemitic post. Irving shared a picture on his social media platforms that featured a link to the film “Hebrews to Negroes: Wake Up Black America.” Based on a book published in 2015, the movie outlines antisemitic conspiracy theories created by Black Israelites.

Shortly after, the team’s owner, Joe Tsai, issued a statement regarding his post. “I’m disappointed that Kyrie appears to support a film based on a book full of anti-Semitic disinformation. I want to sit down and make sure he understands this is hurtful to all of us, and as a man of faith, it is wrong to promote hate based on race, ethnicity or religion.”

The team also spoke on the matter, saying, “The Brooklyn Nets strongly condemn and have no tolerance for the promotion of any form of hate speech. We believe that in these situations, our first action must be open, honest dialogue. We thank those, including the ADL [Anti-Defamation League], who have been supportive during this time.”

While that sparked great controversy, another one of Irving’s opinions is also making headlines.

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Last month, the NBA player shared a 20-year-old rant from Alex Jones on his platform. The far-right radio show host talked about the new world order, and Irving felt his thoughts aligned with today’s times.

Some people were skeptical of Irving’s stance because Alex Jones is now being sued for $965 million for his comments about the Sandy Hook shooting.

During yesterday’s post-game press conference, reporter Nick Friedell grilled Irving on his “promotion” of Alex Jone’s statements.

“I do not stand with Alex Jone’s position, narrative, court case that he had with Sandy Hook,” Irving affirmed. However, he stood on the fact that he agreed with Jones regarding secret societies in America.

“It’s funny; it’s actually hilarious because out of all the things I posted that day, that was the one post that everyone chose to see. It just goes back to the way our world is and works.”

Friedell followed up with his questioning by, again, referring to Irving’s posts as a “promotion.” Frustrated, the athlete urged, “Can you please stop calling it a promotion? What am I promoting?”

“You put it out on your platform,” said Friedell. “I put it out there just like you put things out there, right… stop trying to dehumanize me up here,” interrupted Irving.

Their back-and-forth continued until Irving began to ignore him. As he walked out of the room, he told Friedell, “I wish we cared more about Black reproductive rights and all the things that actually matter than what I’m posting. Change your life, bro.”