Review: DJ Khaled's "Suffering From Success"

 
63%

Editor rating

Golden: 3 Broken: 1
Consensus

Audience rating

221 votes
54%
Review: DJ Khaled's "Suffering From Success"

Editor Rating

35%
Perry Simpson

Best thing about this is "Never Surrender"

This is just not dope. Way too many club records. Too much talk of haters. Only a few good songs.
120
31
88%
Mike De Leon

What a DJ should do

DJ Khaled is a king of compilation. Doing what a DJ should do, Khaled bring you a strong mix of sounds for the club and radio with amazing features and production. He had you singing "No New Friends" all summer!
33
81
65%
Trevor Smith

Suffering From Excess

Much like MMG, Khaled's overblown crew track formula has grown tired. Even highlights like "No New Friends" sound like echoes of the DJ's former hits. Unfortunately, the project's cover carries more personality than any of its songs.
49
26
65%
Nicolas James

Everything Was The Same...

This project suffers from a lack of originality and tact. Even if you’re content with club bangers, the majority of these tracks are repetitive and offer nothing new from any of the 30+ features involved. Khaled’s blockbuster formula is tired.
69
28

Audience Rating

How do you rate this album/mixtape? Very Hottttt Hottttt Meh... Not feeling it Make it stop!  

DJ Khaled’s latest project suffers from a lot more than success.

DJ Khaled has been behind some of the hottest records of the last few years and if there's one thing he's made consistently clear it's that he has a winning formula for hits. This is also his greatest fault.

It's never been so clear how one dimensional DJ Khaled's music really is than here on Suffering From Success, the DJ's seventh studio album.

Regardless of what the title suggests, Suffering From Success is a dense collection of club music across several genres. There's little to nothing in the way of introspection, meditation or “suffering” in the music on this album – barring one, maybe two tracks.

With that said, you aren't likely to find a more consistent, diligent effort in turn-up music than what's presented on this album. Pretty much every song was designed with the sole intention of enhancing your club-hopping weekend, particularly in the south it seems.

Khaled clearly wants to dominate the Top 40 charts with this project. Big names like Future, Meek Mill, Ace Hood, and Lil' Wayne have spent several months at a time on the charts and Khaled clearly meant to leverage these artist's popularity with this record.

The problem is, most people only spend a few nights a week at the club. Many spend even less. With that in mind, this album has almost no utility for the everyday listener. Future's auto-tuned crooning, the throw-away verses from many of these rappers and the general uniformity in the production make it difficult to take this album seriously – or Khaled's art itself.

The hooks are bland at best and cavalier the rest of the time. The writing (all of it, from hooks to verses) generally puts too much focus on “haters” or safe, stunt raps. Instead of nurturing fans, Khaled and his guests continually indulge those that clearly have no love for them or their moves. Then again, this could be a symptom of Khaled's suffering perhaps.

Regardless, the album is an unfortunately weak effort with a couple of exceptions. Lil' Wayne's verse on “No Motive” marks a trend in the emcee's rapping as of late. He seems to be making good on his promise to fans to do better. J Cole did similarly well on “Hell's Kitchen.”

And then there's “Never Surrender.”

This is the best song on the album without question. The record is packed with guest – Scarface, Jadakiss, Meek Mill, John Legend, Akon and Anthony Hamilton. The lyrics are meaningful and the production is slick. “Never Surrender” is arguably the best song DJ Khaled has ever been involved in, with the most argument coming from “Hip-Hop,” which featured Nas and Scarface.

Songs like “Never Surrender” and “Hip-Hop” show what Khaled truly excels at – bringing some of the best artists in rap together to offer up incredible bars that make no sacrifice for content over sonically enjoyable music. It's a shame this talent wasn't explored further on this album.


 

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