Review: Logic's "Welcome to Forever"

Review: Logic's "Welcome to Forever"

Fresh off the cover of XXL, Logic released his mixtape, “Young Sinatra: Welcome to Forever,” celebrating his freshman status in Hip Hop. The Maryland rapper has a new-found confidence that is evident in his tracks as he switches flows, and touches upon different styles, while still remaining true to himself.

Throughout Welcome to Forever Robert Bryson Hall II reflects upon the last year of his career. The opening title track recalls when Logic met Nas for the first time in the line, “Shook his hand then he started quoting my lines? God damn this is real life!”

A certain hunger and drive are present in the Maryland native's voice. The intensity and the leisurely style that he rhymes with have matured since his earlier years. He sounds ready for the mainstream, and at the same time he’s staying humble.

His lyrical prowess that got him attention is evident in tracks like “Roll Call” and “Walk On By.”

On “Roll Call” Logic raps over Outkast’s “Ms. Jackson” with lines like, “If you think these lyrics ain’t deep then you too stupid to listen. Just an outcast with a mission that spits at whoever listens.” He showcases his “Golden Era” flow with witty lines like, “Passing bars back and forth like legal examinations,” on the New York inspired “Walk On By.”

This 20-track behemoth of a tape is sure to have something for any type of Hip Hop fan.

Logic visits the South in his track, “On the Low,” featuring Kid Ink and Trinidad James. He then sounds like an MMG counterpart on “Ballin” with the deep bass hits and rolling snares. “5AM” and “The Come Up” have a Drake feel to them.

The Young Sinatra rapper gets a little sentimental on tracks like “Life is Good” saying, “Is this real life, ok I guess this is what it feels like. Just me and my homies do you realize? This the type of shit I used to prophesize.” He sounds like a younger Big Sean most likely because Key Wane, the producer behind Sean’s “24k of Gold,” also made the beat for Logic.

The two-piece track, “Common Logic Midnight Marauder,” features a flawless flow where Logic never misses a beat. He raps “From Nasty Nas, Big L, to A Tribe Called Quest, the RattPack in other words the tribe’s that next,” over the chorus. With a smooth beat he boasts, “I even made this beat myself just so ya’ll could feel this.” The strongest track on the album: it sums up the package that is Logic.

Logic possesses the talent to out-rap plenty of the emcees in the game as it is. With his new status, Logic must prove himself against his freshman peers, but with his style he stands apart from most of them. What he has to worry about now are the industry heads that are already on top, but with Welcome to Forever, Logic proves that he can rap on their level and in many instances do it better.

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