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TYGA

"We should stop talking about the relationship now,” Tyga quietly but pointedly said to me after an awkward silence. He smiled and turned to his Last Kings artist and producer A.E. There was muffled laughter across the room. “I feel you want the juice!” he exclaimed. “But I don’t know what you want me to say.”

Tyga signed to Young Money almost a decade ago. Last fall, he ended a brief spurt of independence by joining GOOD Music. He now works regularly alongside Kanye West, though he has earned more attention for his relationship with Ye’s half-sister-in-law.

“Kylie Jenner thick, ya gotta feel me,” Tyga raps on his latest single, the irreverent “Feel Me.” Later in the song, Kanye utters the same line, replacing Kylie with Kim K.

Both rapper-beaus embrace the notoriety that comes with their significant others. And the rap world is familiar with each woman’s brand of thickness. Ask 21 Savage. Like Kanye, Tyga likes being seen with such an iconic Hollywood ass, despite the drama it might cause him.

"Feel Me" is included on the upcoming "Bitch I'm the Shit 2," Tyga's 20th mixtape, his first in over a year, and the sequel to the 2011 tape that included the ultra ratchet “Make It Nasty” and the official remix to Drake and Lil Wayne’s “The Motto.”

“What’s the difference between a Rolls Royce and a Bentley, n*gga? ‘Bout $100,000,” Tyga raps -- referencing the outro of Jay Z’s “Imaginary Players” -- on “Gucci Snakes,” featuring Desiigner, the berserk young prodigy on his new label. Thanks to Kylie, who bought him a white Bentley Bentayga -- which he has repurposed with a SpongeBob-yellow paint job and black rims, Tyga’s got both makes in his garage.

“Gucci Snakes” recently received a Hype Williams-directed video, replete with kaleidoscopic boas and reptilian models. As with last year’s Gucci collection, Tyga’s favorite brands are backed by exotic creatures. He wears his threads and his jewelry like a peacock does its plumage. A few years ago, he illegally owned an actual tiger cub for a couple of months, before handing his beastly namesake over to an animal sanctuary. These days, a subtle wave coats the top of his head while carefully etched tiger stripes cover the back and sides.

Smoke seeped out of the aforementioned Bentley truck as the 27-year-old rapper slid out of the driver’s side, arriving at GOOD Music’s nondescript studio compound in North Hollywood about two hours late. He’s easily the slightest of his Last Kings entourage, made up of his manager, bodyguard, and recently formed “CrakWav” production team.

Multiple blunts had been rolled and were being passed around minutes upon entering the studio. Label-less bottles of water -- likely chemically enhanced -- were also in rotation. Tyga removed his do-rag to reveal his much talked about new hairdo.

The first BITS2 track he played started with a high-adrenaline singing verse from Young Thug. Smoke and smiles abound, the Last Kings team was fully immersed in their latest body of work.

Self-described as the quietest guy in the room, Tyga flaunts the loudest diamonds. He also sheds all shyness in his music, rapping with much more menace than one would expect from his gentle speaking voice. Nicknamed T-Raww, he was an indispensable part of the ratchet movement that swept through Cali in the early ‘10s off the force of “Rack City” alone.

Young Thug would set the tone for a mixtape chock full of heavyweights young and old, including both GOOD Music heads, Quavo, Chief Keef, and Vince Staples. The guest list is a reminder of the network Tyga has built during his decade-long career.

Tyga first tasted success with his first official single, 2008’s “Coconut Juice,” a teen party anthem featuring his cousin, Travis McCoy of the Gym Class Heroes. McCoy introduced him to Pete Wentz of Fall Out Boy, who would produce his debut album, No Introduction. Wentz would go on to introduce Tyga, then 18, to Lil Wayne, who signed him later that year.

Wayne liked that the Compton-bred youngster was making Billboard-destined club hits, and not localized gangsta rap. Tyga stayed with Young Money until 2015, when he was able to escape his contract while Wayne and his subsidiary label remained bound under Birdman and Cash Money.

Tyga put out his last album, 2015’s The Gold Album: 18th Dynasty, independently, as a streaming-only release through his Last Kings record label. Barred from including previously released singles -- like collaborations with Young Thug and Justin Bieber -- the album churned out a slim 5,000 equivalent album units in its first week.

“I was holdin’ it [The Gold Album] for a long time, probably at least 6, 7 months,” he said of the underperforming release. “To me, I can’t hold music. Like I have to put it out. If I record something, I wanna put it out the next day. That shit’s my mentality.”

Though known for his charting singles, Tyga has released the vast majority of his output via mixtapes. “I think for mixtapes, it’s something you don’t overthink too much,” he said. “It feels like the true artist, and it feels super current and new.”

“I think I’m just creating my own sound now,” he said of the evolution displayed on BITS2, “from sampling other records that I was inspired by, and telling more of a story and painting a picture of the lifestyle.” Aside from one apiece from Zaytoven and 808 Mafia, all of the beats on BITS2 are built from scratch by CrakWav and Tyga himself.

Making use of a vast and cinematic sonic template, the songs range from soft to abrasive, from luxurious to dark and seedy. Tyga is skilled at altering his voice to suit the attitude of each particular beat. He shouts and he whispers; he sharpens his voice when it’s trappy and harmonizes when entering R&B territory.

The song with Pusha T is about the only thing that continues to inspire the former Virginia Beach kilo-peddler. Though atop the grimy, rave-ready backdrop, dripping with squeaky synth frequencies, the GOOD colleagues rap not about selling dope, but on the effects it has on the models who frequent the hip-hop party circuit. What Tyga does push is his own image, and he makes it sound like affluent young black men are the only thing white girls are more addicted to than their namesake drug.

Far more chilled, the song Tyga has chosen as his next single is a remake of Mase’s “What You Want,” a true Bad Boy classic. “We just watch a lot of Diddy and Mase videos in the studio. That’s just like the energy and the feeling that I’m tryna capture all the time,” he said of the inspiration behind flipping the 20-year-old single, on which he switches out the females of Total for the pitch-perfect ratchet vocals of Ty Dolla $ign.

He smiled while pondering the purity of late-‘90s rap. “That era, and how them videos made me feel, and them rappin’ to those R&B-kinda songs,” he reminisced. “But they way they rapped to them, they thugged it out and made it kind of really masculine, know what I’m sayin’?”

On record, Tyga makes you feel the glare of his VVS-grade smile, makes you fathom the cost of having red snakes woven into your every garment. He’s never modest about what he’s capable of in the bedroom, and he often suggests his girlfriend can attest to his pleasure-giving abilities. “They say she young, I should’ve waited / She a big girl, dog when she stimulated,” he raps on his 2015 single “Stimulated,” seemingly about Kylie, who stars in the video. She could, after all, snag most any rapper in the game, though her loyalty to Tyga likely has less to do with his lyrical boasts than a side of him not portrayed in his music.

As the interview was moved at the last minute from his house in the Kardashian compound to GOOD Studios, I was admittedly bummed I would not get to see Kylie in the flesh and feel the aura of her celebrity. Though it was surreal even when my pesky eyes noticed a familiar figure -- Kylie in a bathing suit -- on Tyga’s homescreen while we chopped it up about the unreleased body of work that was stored on his iPhone. Despite his approachability, there are levels to his lifestyle I’ll never comprehend, I thought.

“It took a lot, career-wise, everything,” Tyga said of his relationship during an interview with Big Boy shortly after he and Kylie broke up last summer. “It overshadowed a lot of my talents and a lot of things that I worked hard for.”

They were back together a week after the interview aired, and they’re still going strong. He recently joined Kylie in the shower during an artsy (NSFW) short film shot by Kylie’s personal photographer Sasha Samsonova.

He seems to be comfortable within the Kardashian extended family. Like the rest of the household, he is now accustomed to being a fixture on the front page of TMZ.

Impressively, he shakes off the burdens of being in the most defamatory spotlight Hollywood has to offer. “People with cameras, man,” he shrugs. “At least they ain’t shootin’ at me! N*ggas worry about that more than anything. Like in high school, going to a house party -- wearing the wrong hat, know what I’m sayin’. That’s real shit.”

Long before he began courting Kylie, Tyga knew and accepted that fame comes with undesirable consequences. The innocence of his rap dreams may have been compromised, but he hasn’t let them go.

“Thinkin’ about when I was younger like, ‘Damn, I just wanted to get a deal, I just wanna be signed, have a video,’” he recalls, “and then you get here and you realize, like, ‘This is some whole other shit going on.’ You just adjust to it and you learn how to move wit it, ‘cause ain’t no turning back.”

Above all, his means to continued prosperity has been to surround himself with the artists he most looks up to. His last album spent two years on the backburner, but that doesn’t negate his fruitful come-up under the leadership of Lil Wayne, his favorite rapper, who bypassed Birdman to land a guest feature on BITS2.

“I was in my room, listening to Wayne mixtapes, like, ‘Man, I wanna rap with Wayne.’ That was my goal, and it happened,” Tyga proudly declared. “It just came into fruition.” He’s now grateful to be under the mentorship of another one of his idols.

“Man, he’s just a genius,” he said of Kanye. “Not a lot of people have been around somebody who’s really a genius. You kinda have to really, like, be around him and spend a day with him to really understand him all the way.”

“I wouldn’t say it’s much different, but the learning is never over,” he said, comparing GOOD to Young Money. “As much stuff as I learned being around Wayne, it’s different than things around Kanye. I just switched universities, you feel me.”

His esteem for his new professor has made him humbly distant from Kanye’s most controversial moments, such as when he met with Donald Trump at Trump Tower in December, making for one of his first public appearances since his nine-day hospitalization for a mental breakdown.

“Only he knows,” Tyga said of the reasoning behind Kanye meeting with the most hated man in hip-hop. “That’s the mind of a genius. Can’t do nothin’ but sit back and watch and believe in somebody.”

“I got opinions,” he clarified. “Everybody’s not gonna agree. I just stay away from stuff like that. I’m not here to be a politician. Like I rap. I’m here to make music, and swag the world out, and just do dope shit.”

He recognizes he’s still very much a student in the art of making dope shit. “During the last two years, it’s just figuring out how to connect with people, and being more open,” he said of his progress in the interim since The Gold Album. “People being able to get to know me, but also lookin’ at me as the rap star .”

Like the men who have signed him, Tyga aspires to be a rap star. But Weezy and Yeezy, icons of the genre, have made art so reflective of their inner-beings that they have transcended the idea of rap superstardom.

Their art is forever tied, in a most compelling way, to their extraordinary celebrity existences. Of course, they have been dealt the pressures of sustaining extraordinary careers and of the public constantly demanding their lifeblood. Kanye will continue, with increasing unpredictability, operate in the public sphere, while Wayne, scarred by broken family ties, will avoid the limelight while trying to squeeze out his remaining inspiration.

What about Tyga? He seems to have secured the rap star starter pack: the toys, the teeth, the platinum plaques, and last but not least, the girl. How does he go about approaching Kanye status, if that’s even a goal of his?

“I can only connect to an artist if I almost know them personally, or if I feel like I know them personally,” Tyga said, going on to mention his all-time favorite artist: “2Pac made you know him personally, even though I never met him. But you felt like, man I know him in and out.”

Tyga has been forthcoming about his regard for 2Pac, sometimes at his own expense. A year ago, he was clowned for an Instagram post showing side-by-side photos of him and Pac, dressed alike, with the caption: “Dad.” “Pac taught me a lot more than my own father,” he tweeted hours later. “Inspired me. Motivated me. Listened without ever being there.”

Despite the reality show lifestyle he is currently navigating, little is known about Tyga’s upbringing. Without alluding to anything specific, he told me his childhood endowed him with a thick skin and a patient outlook: “Man, I was just prepared at a young age. I knew this was what I wanted to do, and I wasn’t gonna let anything get in the way of that. Something prepared me when I was young and told me, look, ‘You got a long road ahead.’”

“I think just going through the things I went through in life at a young age,” he went on. “Just a lot of things. It just made me tougher and tougher, mentally. I got a lot of strong faith, so I don’t steer off course too much.”

Tyga has never met his father, who is currently serving a life sentence for charges undisclosed. On the same night he called 2Pac dad, Tyga posted a correspondence with his real father made in light of his time in confinement clocking in at 25 consecutive years.

“Things could’ve been different if you were around I’m sure,” Tyga wrote in his reply. “But I know life moves on and now I gotta teach my son to be a man. Even though no one ever taught me how to be one.”

Tyga shows fame isn’t easy, and he doesn’t pity himself for the slander or uncomfortable exposure afforded to him by his profession, or by his choice of acquaintances. Each dream that unfolds before his eyes comes with increased pressure to reveal who he really is -- by force or by choice -- and why we should care.

His goals have been molded by the heroes he has been lucky enough to learn from. At some point, he must confront his pre-packaged idea of what a rap star should look like and forge his own definition. His most valuable asset is his story, which he has been reluctant to delve into in a daring way. His life is a whirlwind of opportunity and scandal, of career milestones and new expectations. Approaching two years since The Gold Album, Tyga hopes to deliver the follow-up album later this year. In the meantime, he’s more than earned the right to talk some shit.

 
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TYGA

"We should stop talking about the relationship now,” Tyga quietly but pointedly said to me after an awkward silence. He smiled and turned to his Last Kings artist and producer A.E. There was muffled laughter across the room. “I feel you want the juice!” he exclaimed. “But I don’t know what you want me to say.”

Tyga signed to Young Money almost a decade ago. Last fall, he ended a brief spurt of independence by joining GOOD Music. He now works regularly alongside Kanye West, though he has earned more attention for his relationship with Ye’s half-sister-in-law.

“Kylie Jenner thick, ya gotta feel me,” Tyga raps on his latest single, the irreverent “Feel Me.” Later in the song, Kanye utters the same line, replacing Kylie with Kim K.

Both rapper-beaus embrace the notoriety that comes with their significant others. And the rap world is familiar with each woman’s brand of thickness. Ask 21 Savage. Like Kanye, Tyga likes being seen with such an iconic Hollywood ass, despite the drama it might cause him.

"Feel Me" is included on the upcoming "Bitch I'm the Shit 2," Tyga's 20th mixtape, his first in over a year, and the sequel to the 2011 tape that included the ultra ratchet “Make It Nasty” and the official remix to Drake and Lil Wayne’s “The Motto.”

“What’s the difference between a Rolls Royce and a Bentley, n*gga? ‘Bout $100,000,” Tyga raps -- referencing the outro of Jay Z’s “Imaginary Players” -- on “Gucci Snakes,” featuring Desiigner, the berserk young prodigy on his new label. Thanks to Kylie, who bought him a white Bentley Bentayga -- which he has repurposed with a SpongeBob-yellow paint job and black rims, Tyga’s got both makes in his garage.

“Gucci Snakes” recently received a Hype Williams-directed video, replete with kaleidoscopic boas and reptilian models. As with last year’s Gucci collection, Tyga’s favorite brands are backed by exotic creatures. He wears his threads and his jewelry like a peacock does its plumage. A few years ago, he illegally owned an actual tiger cub for a couple of months, before handing his beastly namesake over to an animal sanctuary. These days, a subtle wave coats the top of his head while carefully etched tiger stripes cover the back and sides.

Smoke seeped out of the aforementioned Bentley truck as the 27-year-old rapper slid out of the driver’s side, arriving at GOOD Music’s nondescript studio compound in North Hollywood about two hours late. He’s easily the slightest of his Last Kings entourage, made up of his manager, bodyguard, and recently formed “CrakWav” production team.

Multiple blunts had been rolled and were being passed around minutes upon entering the studio. Label-less bottles of water -- likely chemically enhanced -- were also in rotation. Tyga removed his do-rag to reveal his much talked about new hairdo.

The first BITS2 track he played started with a high-adrenaline singing verse from Young Thug. Smoke and smiles abound, the Last Kings team was fully immersed in their latest body of work.

Self-described as the quietest guy in the room, Tyga flaunts the loudest diamonds. He also sheds all shyness in his music, rapping with much more menace than one would expect from his gentle speaking voice. Nicknamed T-Raww, he was an indispensable part of the ratchet movement that swept through Cali in the early ‘10s off the force of “Rack City” alone.

Young Thug would set the tone for a mixtape chock full of heavyweights young and old, including both GOOD Music heads, Quavo, Chief Keef, and Vince Staples. The guest list is a reminder of the network Tyga has built during his decade-long career.

Tyga first tasted success with his first official single, 2008’s “Coconut Juice,” a teen party anthem featuring his cousin, Travis McCoy of the Gym Class Heroes. McCoy introduced him to Pete Wentz of Fall Out Boy, who would produce his debut album, No Introduction. Wentz would go on to introduce Tyga, then 18, to Lil Wayne, who signed him later that year.

Wayne liked that the Compton-bred youngster was making Billboard-destined club hits, and not localized gangsta rap. Tyga stayed with Young Money until 2015, when he was able to escape his contract while Wayne and his subsidiary label remained bound under Birdman and Cash Money.

Tyga put out his last album, 2015’s The Gold Album: 18th Dynasty, independently, as a streaming-only release through his Last Kings record label. Barred from including previously released singles -- like collaborations with Young Thug and Justin Bieber -- the album churned out a slim 5,000 equivalent album units in its first week.

“I was holdin’ it [The Gold Album] for a long time, probably at least 6, 7 months,” he said of the underperforming release. “To me, I can’t hold music. Like I have to put it out. If I record something, I wanna put it out the next day. That shit’s my mentality.”

Though known for his charting singles, Tyga has released the vast majority of his output via mixtapes. “I think for mixtapes, it’s something you don’t overthink too much,” he said. “It feels like the true artist, and it feels super current and new.”

“I think I’m just creating my own sound now,” he said of the evolution displayed on BITS2, “from sampling other records that I was inspired by, and telling more of a story and painting a picture of the lifestyle.” Aside from one apiece from Zaytoven and 808 Mafia, all of the beats on BITS2 are built from scratch by CrakWav and Tyga himself.

Making use of a vast and cinematic sonic template, the songs range from soft to abrasive, from luxurious to dark and seedy. Tyga is skilled at altering his voice to suit the attitude of each particular beat. He shouts and he whispers; he sharpens his voice when it’s trappy and harmonizes when entering R&B territory.

The song with Pusha T is about the only thing that continues to inspire the former Virginia Beach kilo-peddler. Though atop the grimy, rave-ready backdrop, dripping with squeaky synth frequencies, the GOOD colleagues rap not about selling dope, but on the effects it has on the models who frequent the hip-hop party circuit. What Tyga does push is his own image, and he makes it sound like affluent young black men are the only thing white girls are more addicted to than their namesake drug.

Far more chilled, the song Tyga has chosen as his next single is a remake of Mase’s “What You Want,” a true Bad Boy classic. “We just watch a lot of Diddy and Mase videos in the studio. That’s just like the energy and the feeling that I’m tryna capture all the time,” he said of the inspiration behind flipping the 20-year-old single, on which he switches out the females of Total for the pitch-perfect ratchet vocals of Ty Dolla $ign.

He smiled while pondering the purity of late-‘90s rap. “That era, and how them videos made me feel, and them rappin’ to those R&B-kinda songs,” he reminisced. “But they way they rapped to them, they thugged it out and made it kind of really masculine, know what I’m sayin’?”

On record, Tyga makes you feel the glare of his VVS-grade smile, makes you fathom the cost of having red snakes woven into your every garment. He’s never modest about what he’s capable of in the bedroom, and he often suggests his girlfriend can attest to his pleasure-giving abilities. “They say she young, I should’ve waited / She a big girl, dog when she stimulated,” he raps on his 2015 single “Stimulated,” seemingly about Kylie, who stars in the video. She could, after all, snag most any rapper in the game, though her loyalty to Tyga likely has less to do with his lyrical boasts than a side of him not portrayed in his music.

As the interview was moved at the last minute from his house in the Kardashian compound to GOOD Studios, I was admittedly bummed I would not get to see Kylie in the flesh and feel the aura of her celebrity. Though it was surreal even when my pesky eyes noticed a familiar figure -- Kylie in a bathing suit -- on Tyga’s homescreen while we chopped it up about the unreleased body of work that was stored on his iPhone. Despite his approachability, there are levels to his lifestyle I’ll never comprehend, I thought.

“It took a lot, career-wise, everything,” Tyga said of his relationship during an interview with Big Boy shortly after he and Kylie broke up last summer. “It overshadowed a lot of my talents and a lot of things that I worked hard for.”

They were back together a week after the interview aired, and they’re still going strong. He recently joined Kylie in the shower during an artsy (NSFW) short film shot by Kylie’s personal photographer Sasha Samsonova.

He seems to be comfortable within the Kardashian extended family. Like the rest of the household, he is now accustomed to being a fixture on the front page of TMZ.

Impressively, he shakes off the burdens of being in the most defamatory spotlight Hollywood has to offer. “People with cameras, man,” he shrugs. “At least they ain’t shootin’ at me! N*ggas worry about that more than anything. Like in high school, going to a house party -- wearing the wrong hat, know what I’m sayin’. That’s real shit.”

Long before he began courting Kylie, Tyga knew and accepted that fame comes with undesirable consequences. The innocence of his rap dreams may have been compromised, but he hasn’t let them go.

“Thinkin’ about when I was younger like, ‘Damn, I just wanted to get a deal, I just wanna be signed, have a video,’” he recalls, “and then you get here and you realize, like, ‘This is some whole other shit going on.’ You just adjust to it and you learn how to move wit it, ‘cause ain’t no turning back.”

Above all, his means to continued prosperity has been to surround himself with the artists he most looks up to. His last album spent two years on the backburner, but that doesn’t negate his fruitful come-up under the leadership of Lil Wayne, his favorite rapper, who bypassed Birdman to land a guest feature on BITS2.

“I was in my room, listening to Wayne mixtapes, like, ‘Man, I wanna rap with Wayne.’ That was my goal, and it happened,” Tyga proudly declared. “It just came into fruition.” He’s now grateful to be under the mentorship of another one of his idols.

“Man, he’s just a genius,” he said of Kanye. “Not a lot of people have been around somebody who’s really a genius. You kinda have to really, like, be around him and spend a day with him to really understand him all the way.”

“I wouldn’t say it’s much different, but the learning is never over,” he said, comparing GOOD to Young Money. “As much stuff as I learned being around Wayne, it’s different than things around Kanye. I just switched universities, you feel me.”

His esteem for his new professor has made him humbly distant from Kanye’s most controversial moments, such as when he met with Donald Trump at Trump Tower in December, making for one of his first public appearances since his nine-day hospitalization for a mental breakdown.

“Only he knows,” Tyga said of the reasoning behind Kanye meeting with the most hated man in hip-hop. “That’s the mind of a genius. Can’t do nothin’ but sit back and watch and believe in somebody.”

“I got opinions,” he clarified. “Everybody’s not gonna agree. I just stay away from stuff like that. I’m not here to be a politician. Like I rap. I’m here to make music, and swag the world out, and just do dope shit.”

He recognizes he’s still very much a student in the art of making dope shit. “During the last two years, it’s just figuring out how to connect with people, and being more open,” he said of his progress in the interim since The Gold Album. “People being able to get to know me, but also lookin’ at me as the rap star .”

Like the men who have signed him, Tyga aspires to be a rap star. But Weezy and Yeezy, icons of the genre, have made art so reflective of their inner-beings that they have transcended the idea of rap superstardom.

Their art is forever tied, in a most compelling way, to their extraordinary celebrity existences. Of course, they have been dealt the pressures of sustaining extraordinary careers and of the public constantly demanding their lifeblood. Kanye will continue, with increasing unpredictability, operate in the public sphere, while Wayne, scarred by broken family ties, will avoid the limelight while trying to squeeze out his remaining inspiration.

What about Tyga? He seems to have secured the rap star starter pack: the toys, the teeth, the platinum plaques, and last but not least, the girl. How does he go about approaching Kanye status, if that’s even a goal of his?

“I can only connect to an artist if I almost know them personally, or if I feel like I know them personally,” Tyga said, going on to mention his all-time favorite artist: “2Pac made you know him personally, even though I never met him. But you felt like, man I know him in and out.”

Tyga has been forthcoming about his regard for 2Pac, sometimes at his own expense. A year ago, he was clowned for an Instagram post showing side-by-side photos of him and Pac, dressed alike, with the caption: “Dad.” “Pac taught me a lot more than my own father,” he tweeted hours later. “Inspired me. Motivated me. Listened without ever being there.”

Despite the reality show lifestyle he is currently navigating, little is known about Tyga’s upbringing. Without alluding to anything specific, he told me his childhood endowed him with a thick skin and a patient outlook: “Man, I was just prepared at a young age. I knew this was what I wanted to do, and I wasn’t gonna let anything get in the way of that. Something prepared me when I was young and told me, look, ‘You got a long road ahead.’”

“I think just going through the things I went through in life at a young age,” he went on. “Just a lot of things. It just made me tougher and tougher, mentally. I got a lot of strong faith, so I don’t steer off course too much.”

Tyga has never met his father, who is currently serving a life sentence for charges undisclosed. On the same night he called 2Pac dad, Tyga posted a correspondence with his real father made in light of his time in confinement clocking in at 25 consecutive years.

“Things could’ve been different if you were around I’m sure,” Tyga wrote in his reply. “But I know life moves on and now I gotta teach my son to be a man. Even though no one ever taught me how to be one.”

Tyga shows fame isn’t easy, and he doesn’t pity himself for the slander or uncomfortable exposure afforded to him by his profession, or by his choice of acquaintances. Each dream that unfolds before his eyes comes with increased pressure to reveal who he really is -- by force or by choice -- and why we should care.

His goals have been molded by the heroes he has been lucky enough to learn from. At some point, he must confront his pre-packaged idea of what a rap star should look like and forge his own definition. His most valuable asset is his story, which he has been reluctant to delve into in a daring way. His life is a whirlwind of opportunity and scandal, of career milestones and new expectations. Approaching two years since The Gold Album, Tyga hopes to deliver the follow-up album later this year. In the meantime, he’s more than earned the right to talk some shit.

 
CLOSE
Prateek Prateek
top comment
Prateek Prateek
Mar 24, 2017

WE NEED THE RELEASE DATE!?

  2
Reply Share
Pablo Santos
Pablo Santos
Oct 1, 2017

last king..

Bender Bending Rodriguez

these features are stacked. I'm hyped for this

 
Reply Share
Rozay
Rozay
Mar 25, 2017

too bad this fag got caught sucking tranny dick

 
Reply Share
Lyga Simpson - The Court Jester of L's

Another L ☺️

  1
Reply Share
I'm My Papi Who Raised Me Oneself

Tyga is the real one, he's unruly. PERIOD!!! BLAC CHYNA IS A LIL' BITCH.

  2
Reply Share
P3 worst PND album yet

Tyga a real one for calling out drake for what he really is.. a lil bitch

 
Reply Share
Top Comment
Top Comment
Mar 25, 2017

Lyga Simpson is a little bitch & that haircut is hella fruity fuck that wavecap 2 nigga

  2
Reply Share
Top Comment
Top Comment
Mar 25, 2017

I used to rock with this fool back in the day but he turned into the Lovable House Cat named Lyga & started doing everything except for fucking rapping!

  1
Reply Share
ClassicMarqB
ClassicMarqB
Mar 25, 2017

for some reason the scrolling on this article page is fucked up.

 
Reply Share
Tony T Raww
Tony T Raww
Mar 24, 2017

Tyga bring the west coast ratchet sound in this tape 🔥🔥🔥

 
Reply Share
Playboy X
Playboy X
Mar 24, 2017

Damn those r sum dope ass features

 
Reply Share
Dick Tofu
Dick Tofu
Mar 24, 2017

Why he look so sad in the first pic?

 
Reply Share
Playboy X
Playboy X
Mar 24, 2017

#BITS2OTW

 
Reply Share
💰Richthecat💰
💰Richthecat💰
Mar 24, 2017

I got about halfway through and realized I couldn't waste this much time on an article about TYGA

  5
Reply Share
ViBe God
ViBe God
Mar 24, 2017

Who is this guy again 😂😂😂

  6
Reply Share
Made_to_Post
Made_to_Post
Mar 24, 2017

Cool article!

 
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Officer Ricky (T.I.N.T)

Tyga is garbage. He should stick to being Kylie's lapdog

  5
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Piru_100niggas_in_ATL

Tyga got at HnHH for all dem L's we gave in they articles.

  1
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ViBe God

@Pimp-Czar : get off washed up tygas nuts bruh

  3
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Jay Z's Alter Ego
Jay Z's Alter Ego
Mar 24, 2017

Like if you only clicked this article to read the comments

  2
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Prateek Prateek
Prateek Prateek
Mar 24, 2017

WE NEED THE RELEASE DATE!?

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