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Kevin Gates
is
above it

Words by: Rose Lilah

Photos by: Emilio Sanchez

Kevin Gates is an “energy person.” He’s an avid truth teller. He’s metaphorical in nature. He’s spiritual. He’s a conversationalist. Today, he’s also indifferent. 

It’s been under a week since Kevin Gates dropped the follow-up to Islah, an album that took the mainstream charts by both surprise and storm. Similar to Islah, I’m Him is bereft of features. There is no shiny veneer, no corny marketing ploy to help boost the album into the public’s consciousness-- it’s quite literally, just Gates. The album cover is Gates x2. A photo of his younger self burning up within the face of his current self; perhaps a depiction of, or an homage to, Gates’ impressive personal evolution. He independently powers through all seventeen songs, relying on his hook-making ability, his deep stash of flows, and his reflective nature. He’ll be taking the album on tour across the United States come early October, and he’s supposed to be rehearsing today. We’re awaiting his arrival at the P.A. Rehearsal Studio in Van Nuys, California.

When Gates pulls up about an hour later than expected-- which, in rapper-speak, is actually almost on time-- he politely asks us to forgive his lateness, greeting everyone with a hug, and a soft, knowing smile. He’s wearing a bleach-white Ralph Lauren t-shirt, its crispness interrupted by a few stubborn wrinkles, a blemish that would have deeply concerned him back in the day.

“I’ve dealt with insecurity issues, to where I couldn’t leave the house if my shirt was wrinkled,” he admits. “If my shoes had one smudge on it I would have to clean it off.” His t-shirt is paired with slouching beige joggers hanging loosely off his hips, and eggshell blue Hermes slides that look like something in which your grandfather would shuffle around aimlessly. 

His mouth, little diamonds where white teeth should be, appear to be dancing beneath the sun rays. His skin, looking as healthy as ever, has an iridescent sheen to it. This is Kevin Gates at the peak of his spiritual evolution, one which culminated in a physical glow up. “On a metaphysical scale, all components work together,” says Gates of the mind-body-soul connection, in his typically verbose manner. The rapper, who has been in and out of prison since a youth (with the most recent stint ending in January 2018) has carved out his very own success story, an amazing feat of discipline and empowerment, one that encompasses all aspects of his person-- much like Gucci Mane. “He’s Aquarius too. You gotta go through darkness so you can fully appreciate light,” says Gates. The two share more than just a zodiac sign, each embodying the idea that you can change, you can grow out of any given circumstance and rise above it-- you can 2.0 yourself. 

“You gotta go through darkness so you can fully appreciate light.”

We’re shooting Gates outside, moving from the non-descript parking lot of the low-rise building to an abandoned lot beside the rehearsal studio. It’s ravaged with garbage. A doll with her eye poked out, a lonesome dirtied black sock, leftover food containers, a grocery shopping cart, a “No Trespassing” sign. The grittiness feels appropriate for someone like Gates, whose music is raw and cadence gravelly. He’s changed outfits, now sporting the sleekest, and perhaps most costly, all-black workout attire I’ve ever seen, complete with black shades. The rapper is easily the center of attention; his gravitas commands it. He’s aware of it too, referring to himself as the “most interesting uninteresting” man. He doesn’t watch TV, he doesn’t actually do anything. “People that are unhappy and depressed spend more money on entertainment and consuming things to take them away from whatever pain or whatever emotion or states that they’re in at the time, than a person that’s happy,” he explains. “My entertainment comes in a different form. I like working out, feeling good, and I’m a lover of people. I like fly conversations. I also love my alone time. I love my solitude because I learn things.” 

Beyond Gates’ assessment of humanity, something which seems to be an ongoing practice of his, he’s also a lover of nature and wildlife. He analyzes animal behavior perhaps just as much as he does humans, picking and choosing information that will directly affect his own perspective and habits therein. He shares facts like “butterflies drink turtle tears”-- the type of Discovery Channel-esque facts that you want to question further and double-check their veracity on Google, but you probably forget and keep it moving, none-the-wiser. He’s a seemingly never-ending well of information: things he’s gleaned about the eating habits of tigers, how avoiding the sun can cause disease.

This is part of what makes him such an enigmatic character. The Baton Rouge native, born Kevin Jerome Gilyard, was relegated to local success before finally gaining traction on a national scale with The Luca Brasi Story mixtape in 2013. His penchant for articulation, for publicly professing his deepest thoughts, and for steering his records with his emotions and an overall moodiness became his trademark.

These days, though, Kevin Gates is indifferent.

I want to try to understand exactly what that means, but Gates refuses to elaborate. I’m so indifferent right now, he repeats. Knowing that Kevin Gates is an avid truth teller, I could take “I’m indifferent” completely at face value-- but I also know that Kevin Gates is metaphorical in nature. Is there another meaning to “I’m indifferent?” Within the first five minutes of our interview he warns me: “A lot of the stuff I’m going to say is going to be misinterpreted. But I’ll be honest with you, I don’t give a fuck.” His publicist attempts to counter his statement of indifference, prodding him to say that he’s "at peace." He refuses to back down. I’m indifferent.

After our photo shoot wraps up, we head back inside the P.A. Rehearsal Studio, winding through the black hallways lined with posters detailing the inner-workings of various musical instruments. The rehearsal room is heavily padded and dimly-lit. There’s no sunshine creeping in, no windows or crevices through which it could creep even if it wanted. The energy is different here, and after our interview wraps up, I think wistfully that we should have done the interview outside-- in the sun, in the warmth. This black-painted room is draining even without Gates’ echoing the statement. I should have known better too; Gates is an energy person, after all. I’m just grateful at this point that he even likes my energy. I’ve seen what happens when he doesn’t-- so the entire morning I’m doing my best to make sure my energy is right. I go for a run, I fast (two coffees notwithstanding). Ahead of sitting down with me on the worn-in leather couch occupying the middle of the rehearsal room, Gates changes into more casual workout attire: a heather blue Nike zip-up and the shorts to match, with black leggings underneath. He sits on the floor cross-legged, stretching his hips, before he moves up to the couch beside me. These are his yoga clothes, because he’s going to a class after this. It’s one of the many practices he’s taken up during his journey to wellness, one he would have rebuffed easily in his former years. 

It was a great feeling that I was having in 2007, and that was the closest thing to happiness I probably ever knew,” Gates recalls, visibly reflecting time passed. “But right now, I’m just taking everything that comes with it and I’m just living for the first time in my life. It’s like I’m an infant again. It’s like I’m re-learning how to do everything because I come from being a gangster, I come from being in a hard-baller, aggressive lane. Just being in nature, I learned a lot from nature because everything in nature coexists.”

The definition of “coexistence” is to exist together or at the same time. Oftentimes, what accompanies this word is “peaceful,” as in, a peaceful coexistence. Another online definition actually includes the idea of peace within it: To live in peace with another or others despite differences, especially as a matter of policy. However, coexistence happens with or without peace. That’s the idea-- two differing, opposing ideologies can coexist in one space. Two rivals can coexist in the same space whether or not they are truly at peace with each other-- letting the other just be. This is important. 

“I’m on coexistence,” he continues. “I used to establish dominance in every situation I would go in out of fear. Because I’ve been in environments where you had to be the eater, or you would be eaten. And now I’m re-learning how to live life from the perspective of coexistence and appreciating everything about everybody. Because when you look at life and the molecular structure of things, it’s the smallest insignificant things that you can’t even see that play the biggest parts. Like people pay $50,000 or $80,000 for fucking stem cells. You can’t even see that shit. But they’re one of the more significant things on earth. So that’s what I meant [by] it, just appreciating the small stuff.”

When Gates says he’s “indifferent” it could mean that he’s above it: he’s above the mundane emotions, thoughts and decisions that drive and form us each new day. Things like, hunger, happiness, loneliness. For him, these factors are, in essence, non-factors, because he will (co)exist regardless. He will live with the hunger until he eats his singular meal, usually between the hours of 2 PM and 7 PM. Today, that meal will probably be fish tacos. He will live and be in his current state, regardless of the space and the people that surround him. He uses any negative emotions as fuel for a workout, excited to harness them. “Whenever I have negative thoughts or anything I just channel it into something positive,” he explains. “Anger is a good thing if you know how to channel it. Now I look forward to the things that make me upset because I know I’ll get a good workout. I look forward to disappointment now. I don’t care. I’m just coexisting, I’m coasting.”

To coast is to act or make progress without making much effort. As much as Kevin Gates says he doesn’t care, he’s indifferent, he’s coexisting (it’s worth noting that he says this a total of ten times in one form or another throughout our conversation), perhaps it’s more apt to simply label it: coasting. He’s taking everything for what it is, in whatever state it is, and allowing it to be, including himself. Not all rappers require this much unpacking to merely understand what in the actual fuck they mean. Few, if any, are as sesquipedalian as Kevin Gates.

“I done had my loyalty used against me. I’ve dealt with insecurity issues. I’ve dealt with changing clothes a million times because I felt fat.”

Gates is a voracious reader. Despite his rise in fame he still frequents Barnes & Nobles, somehow going unnoticed. "I vibrate on such a high level to where…You ever walk up to somebody and they’re like, 'I didn’t even see you right there, you startled me?'" he muses. "I vibrate at such a high level that most of the bullshit can’t even see me. I don’t even see it."

While I picture him as a non-fiction enthusiast, perhaps because of all the worldly facts I’ve just received from him, he counters that, from his perspective, fiction holds more truth than non. “What’s nonfiction?” he asks, “Most of the most realistic books are in the fiction section. Like, The Celestine Prophecy, that’s a great book.” 

The Celestine Prophecy, for the uninitiated, is a fictitious story which more or less documents the spiritual awakening of the first-person narrator, who embarks on a journey to Peru in order to understand nine insights from an ancient manuscript. This recalls another book Gates has mentioned in a previous interview, The Alchemist. Again, a fictitious story where the first-person narrator undertakes a spiritual quest, an expansive journey to the pyramids in Egypt after having a dream he believes is prophetic. Both novels, while fictitious, are also parables-- there’s an overarching lesson to each story, an effort to assist the reader in finding their own truths and purpose. It’s unsurprising that this is the type of book Gates gravitates towards. If Kevin Gates were to write a book, the most discerning factor, he says, would be truth

“I’d write about myself, if I were to write [a book], I’d be all the way honest. Like, I’d tell you how it felt when a girl told me no, how it felt to not get the girl who you really wanted to be with, how it feels to obligate yourself to somebody just because they did something kind for you and you obligate yourself to their life. Only because they did something kind to you and you’d never been shown that type of kindness before, so you look at it like a life altering experience instead of just appreciating that person forever, and not obligating yourself to them. I done that. I done had my loyalty used against me. I’ve dealt with insecurity issues. I’ve dealt with changing clothes a million times because I felt fat. There’s all kinds of things. I wasn’t comfortable in my own skin. Even though on the outside I had this facade like, “he’s a monster,” and this and that. I was crying for help on the inside. I done been that person before. So I would tell the truth, because I know that it could help a lot of people.”

This sentiment is repeated throughout Gates’ music, especially his latest album, which is an extension of his self-improvement mentality. It’s a record filled with songs encouraging the listener towards personal growth, instilling them with motivation, inspiration and love. The pounding and invigorating “Push It,” the relatability of being down-and-out on “Have You Ever,” the album closer that reminds us all is not lost, “Fly Again.” 

Somehow, the unlikely mainstream star has become an equally unlikely self-help guru.

He works out two times a day. 
He only eats one meal a day. 
He meditates. 
He holds himself accountable. 

These habits could all be plucked right out of a self-help book. Instead, they’re coming from a former drug-dealing gangster rapper turned devout Muslim.

After our interview wraps up, I get to witness Gates during a Facebook Live session with his fans. He’s sprawled out across the dirtied-white couch. I’ve moved over to the stage-portion of the rehearsal space, viewing him from across the room. He is in the midst of making peoples’ days-- literally, he's making day after day-- by video chatting directly with his fans. I hear the fans on the other end, excited, amazed, in disbelief that they’re actually talking to Kevin Gates. Beyond their collective excitement, each fan thanks Gates in their own way for whatever it is the Louisiana rapper has helped them accomplish. One fan gushes about how she is shedding excess weight upon marveling at Gates’ own weight loss journey. Another fan confesses that Gates has changed the way she looks at life thanks to the wisdom he's doled out in his many YouTube interviews. He takes their praise lightly, almost in passing. 

“I’m only here to help,” he responds. “And then, I don’t seek no reward. That’s how you know you did it out of sincerity, when you do it in secret. When you help somebody secretly. That’s sincerity. The sincerity is keeping the secret, to me. That’s why I’m such a good friend. I’m just not friendly, but I’m a great friend.” 

He concludes, “It’s amazing to see somebody come out the slums, come from nothing, to become this. It’s amazing.”

0/1000CLOSE
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Kevin Gates
is
above it

Words by: Rose Lilah

Photos by: Emilio Sanchez

Kevin Gates is an “energy person.” He’s an avid truth teller. He’s metaphorical in nature. He’s spiritual. He’s a conversationalist. Today, he’s also indifferent. 

It’s been under a week since Kevin Gates dropped the follow-up to Islah, an album that took the mainstream charts by both surprise and storm. Similar to Islah, I’m Him is bereft of features. There is no shiny veneer, no corny marketing ploy to help boost the album into the public’s consciousness-- it’s quite literally, just Gates. The album cover is Gates x2. A photo of his younger self burning up within the face of his current self; perhaps a depiction of, or an homage to, Gates’ impressive personal evolution. He independently powers through all seventeen songs, relying on his hook-making ability, his deep stash of flows, and his reflective nature. He’ll be taking the album on tour across the United States come early October, and he’s supposed to be rehearsing today. We’re awaiting his arrival at the P.A. Rehearsal Studio in Van Nuys, California.

When Gates pulls up about an hour later than expected-- which, in rapper-speak, is actually almost on time-- he politely asks us to forgive his lateness, greeting everyone with a hug, and a soft, knowing smile. He’s wearing a bleach-white Ralph Lauren t-shirt, its crispness interrupted by a few stubborn wrinkles, a blemish that would have deeply concerned him back in the day.

“I’ve dealt with insecurity issues, to where I couldn’t leave the house if my shirt was wrinkled,” he admits. “If my shoes had one smudge on it I would have to clean it off.” His t-shirt is paired with slouching beige joggers hanging loosely off his hips, and eggshell blue Hermes slides that look like something in which your grandfather would shuffle around aimlessly. 

His mouth, little diamonds where white teeth should be, appear to be dancing beneath the sun rays. His skin, looking as healthy as ever, has an iridescent sheen to it. This is Kevin Gates at the peak of his spiritual evolution, one which culminated in a physical glow up. “On a metaphysical scale, all components work together,” says Gates of the mind-body-soul connection, in his typically verbose manner. The rapper, who has been in and out of prison since a youth (with the most recent stint ending in January 2018) has carved out his very own success story, an amazing feat of discipline and empowerment, one that encompasses all aspects of his person-- much like Gucci Mane. “He’s Aquarius too. You gotta go through darkness so you can fully appreciate light,” says Gates. The two share more than just a zodiac sign, each embodying the idea that you can change, you can grow out of any given circumstance and rise above it-- you can 2.0 yourself. 

“You gotta go through darkness so you can fully appreciate light.”

We’re shooting Gates outside, moving from the non-descript parking lot of the low-rise building to an abandoned lot beside the rehearsal studio. It’s ravaged with garbage. A doll with her eye poked out, a lonesome dirtied black sock, leftover food containers, a grocery shopping cart, a “No Trespassing” sign. The grittiness feels appropriate for someone like Gates, whose music is raw and cadence gravelly. He’s changed outfits, now sporting the sleekest, and perhaps most costly, all-black workout attire I’ve ever seen, complete with black shades. The rapper is easily the center of attention; his gravitas commands it. He’s aware of it too, referring to himself as the “most interesting uninteresting” man. He doesn’t watch TV, he doesn’t actually do anything. “People that are unhappy and depressed spend more money on entertainment and consuming things to take them away from whatever pain or whatever emotion or states that they’re in at the time, than a person that’s happy,” he explains. “My entertainment comes in a different form. I like working out, feeling good, and I’m a lover of people. I like fly conversations. I also love my alone time. I love my solitude because I learn things.” 

Beyond Gates’ assessment of humanity, something which seems to be an ongoing practice of his, he’s also a lover of nature and wildlife. He analyzes animal behavior perhaps just as much as he does humans, picking and choosing information that will directly affect his own perspective and habits therein. He shares facts like “butterflies drink turtle tears”-- the type of Discovery Channel-esque facts that you want to question further and double-check their veracity on Google, but you probably forget and keep it moving, none-the-wiser. He’s a seemingly never-ending well of information: things he’s gleaned about the eating habits of tigers, how avoiding the sun can cause disease.

This is part of what makes him such an enigmatic character. The Baton Rouge native, born Kevin Jerome Gilyard, was relegated to local success before finally gaining traction on a national scale with The Luca Brasi Story mixtape in 2013. His penchant for articulation, for publicly professing his deepest thoughts, and for steering his records with his emotions and an overall moodiness became his trademark.

These days, though, Kevin Gates is indifferent.

I want to try to understand exactly what that means, but Gates refuses to elaborate. I’m so indifferent right now, he repeats. Knowing that Kevin Gates is an avid truth teller, I could take “I’m indifferent” completely at face value-- but I also know that Kevin Gates is metaphorical in nature. Is there another meaning to “I’m indifferent?” Within the first five minutes of our interview he warns me: “A lot of the stuff I’m going to say is going to be misinterpreted. But I’ll be honest with you, I don’t give a fuck.” His publicist attempts to counter his statement of indifference, prodding him to say that he’s "at peace." He refuses to back down. I’m indifferent.

After our photo shoot wraps up, we head back inside the P.A. Rehearsal Studio, winding through the black hallways lined with posters detailing the inner-workings of various musical instruments. The rehearsal room is heavily padded and dimly-lit. There’s no sunshine creeping in, no windows or crevices through which it could creep even if it wanted. The energy is different here, and after our interview wraps up, I think wistfully that we should have done the interview outside-- in the sun, in the warmth. This black-painted room is draining even without Gates’ echoing the statement. I should have known better too; Gates is an energy person, after all. I’m just grateful at this point that he even likes my energy. I’ve seen what happens when he doesn’t-- so the entire morning I’m doing my best to make sure my energy is right. I go for a run, I fast (two coffees notwithstanding). Ahead of sitting down with me on the worn-in leather couch occupying the middle of the rehearsal room, Gates changes into more casual workout attire: a heather blue Nike zip-up and the shorts to match, with black leggings underneath. He sits on the floor cross-legged, stretching his hips, before he moves up to the couch beside me. These are his yoga clothes, because he’s going to a class after this. It’s one of the many practices he’s taken up during his journey to wellness, one he would have rebuffed easily in his former years. 

It was a great feeling that I was having in 2007, and that was the closest thing to happiness I probably ever knew,” Gates recalls, visibly reflecting time passed. “But right now, I’m just taking everything that comes with it and I’m just living for the first time in my life. It’s like I’m an infant again. It’s like I’m re-learning how to do everything because I come from being a gangster, I come from being in a hard-baller, aggressive lane. Just being in nature, I learned a lot from nature because everything in nature coexists.”

The definition of “coexistence” is to exist together or at the same time. Oftentimes, what accompanies this word is “peaceful,” as in, a peaceful coexistence. Another online definition actually includes the idea of peace within it: To live in peace with another or others despite differences, especially as a matter of policy. However, coexistence happens with or without peace. That’s the idea-- two differing, opposing ideologies can coexist in one space. Two rivals can coexist in the same space whether or not they are truly at peace with each other-- letting the other just be. This is important. 

“I’m on coexistence,” he continues. “I used to establish dominance in every situation I would go in out of fear. Because I’ve been in environments where you had to be the eater, or you would be eaten. And now I’m re-learning how to live life from the perspective of coexistence and appreciating everything about everybody. Because when you look at life and the molecular structure of things, it’s the smallest insignificant things that you can’t even see that play the biggest parts. Like people pay $50,000 or $80,000 for fucking stem cells. You can’t even see that shit. But they’re one of the more significant things on earth. So that’s what I meant [by] it, just appreciating the small stuff.”

When Gates says he’s “indifferent” it could mean that he’s above it: he’s above the mundane emotions, thoughts and decisions that drive and form us each new day. Things like, hunger, happiness, loneliness. For him, these factors are, in essence, non-factors, because he will (co)exist regardless. He will live with the hunger until he eats his singular meal, usually between the hours of 2 PM and 7 PM. Today, that meal will probably be fish tacos. He will live and be in his current state, regardless of the space and the people that surround him. He uses any negative emotions as fuel for a workout, excited to harness them. “Whenever I have negative thoughts or anything I just channel it into something positive,” he explains. “Anger is a good thing if you know how to channel it. Now I look forward to the things that make me upset because I know I’ll get a good workout. I look forward to disappointment now. I don’t care. I’m just coexisting, I’m coasting.”

To coast is to act or make progress without making much effort. As much as Kevin Gates says he doesn’t care, he’s indifferent, he’s coexisting (it’s worth noting that he says this a total of ten times in one form or another throughout our conversation), perhaps it’s more apt to simply label it: coasting. He’s taking everything for what it is, in whatever state it is, and allowing it to be, including himself. Not all rappers require this much unpacking to merely understand what in the actual fuck they mean. Few, if any, are as sesquipedalian as Kevin Gates.

“I done had my loyalty used against me. I’ve dealt with insecurity issues. I’ve dealt with changing clothes a million times because I felt fat.”

Gates is a voracious reader. Despite his rise in fame he still frequents Barnes & Nobles, somehow going unnoticed. "I vibrate on such a high level to where…You ever walk up to somebody and they’re like, 'I didn’t even see you right there, you startled me?'" he muses. "I vibrate at such a high level that most of the bullshit can’t even see me. I don’t even see it."

While I picture him as a non-fiction enthusiast, perhaps because of all the worldly facts I’ve just received from him, he counters that, from his perspective, fiction holds more truth than non. “What’s nonfiction?” he asks, “Most of the most realistic books are in the fiction section. Like, The Celestine Prophecy, that’s a great book.” 

The Celestine Prophecy, for the uninitiated, is a fictitious story which more or less documents the spiritual awakening of the first-person narrator, who embarks on a journey to Peru in order to understand nine insights from an ancient manuscript. This recalls another book Gates has mentioned in a previous interview, The Alchemist. Again, a fictitious story where the first-person narrator undertakes a spiritual quest, an expansive journey to the pyramids in Egypt after having a dream he believes is prophetic. Both novels, while fictitious, are also parables-- there’s an overarching lesson to each story, an effort to assist the reader in finding their own truths and purpose. It’s unsurprising that this is the type of book Gates gravitates towards. If Kevin Gates were to write a book, the most discerning factor, he says, would be truth

“I’d write about myself, if I were to write [a book], I’d be all the way honest. Like, I’d tell you how it felt when a girl told me no, how it felt to not get the girl who you really wanted to be with, how it feels to obligate yourself to somebody just because they did something kind for you and you obligate yourself to their life. Only because they did something kind to you and you’d never been shown that type of kindness before, so you look at it like a life altering experience instead of just appreciating that person forever, and not obligating yourself to them. I done that. I done had my loyalty used against me. I’ve dealt with insecurity issues. I’ve dealt with changing clothes a million times because I felt fat. There’s all kinds of things. I wasn’t comfortable in my own skin. Even though on the outside I had this facade like, “he’s a monster,” and this and that. I was crying for help on the inside. I done been that person before. So I would tell the truth, because I know that it could help a lot of people.”

This sentiment is repeated throughout Gates’ music, especially his latest album, which is an extension of his self-improvement mentality. It’s a record filled with songs encouraging the listener towards personal growth, instilling them with motivation, inspiration and love. The pounding and invigorating “Push It,” the relatability of being down-and-out on “Have You Ever,” the album closer that reminds us all is not lost, “Fly Again.” 

Somehow, the unlikely mainstream star has become an equally unlikely self-help guru.

He works out two times a day. 
He only eats one meal a day. 
He meditates. 
He holds himself accountable. 

These habits could all be plucked right out of a self-help book. Instead, they’re coming from a former drug-dealing gangster rapper turned devout Muslim.

After our interview wraps up, I get to witness Gates during a Facebook Live session with his fans. He’s sprawled out across the dirtied-white couch. I’ve moved over to the stage-portion of the rehearsal space, viewing him from across the room. He is in the midst of making peoples’ days-- literally, he's making day after day-- by video chatting directly with his fans. I hear the fans on the other end, excited, amazed, in disbelief that they’re actually talking to Kevin Gates. Beyond their collective excitement, each fan thanks Gates in their own way for whatever it is the Louisiana rapper has helped them accomplish. One fan gushes about how she is shedding excess weight upon marveling at Gates’ own weight loss journey. Another fan confesses that Gates has changed the way she looks at life thanks to the wisdom he's doled out in his many YouTube interviews. He takes their praise lightly, almost in passing. 

“I’m only here to help,” he responds. “And then, I don’t seek no reward. That’s how you know you did it out of sincerity, when you do it in secret. When you help somebody secretly. That’s sincerity. The sincerity is keeping the secret, to me. That’s why I’m such a good friend. I’m just not friendly, but I’m a great friend.” 

He concludes, “It’s amazing to see somebody come out the slums, come from nothing, to become this. It’s amazing.”

0/1000CLOSE
Rose Lilah
top comment
ADMIN
Rose Lilah
Nov 8, 2019

as always...let us know what you think!!

manifesting
manifesting
Nov 10, 2019

This was a good article.

Joey
Joey
Nov 10, 2019

He not above fucking his cousin

daviannadenson5
daviannadenson5
Nov 10, 2019

As Aslways Breadwinner🏆 Association. All Day💕 keep up the good work IN GOD I TRUST VERY UNIQUE STORY I've had so much Love FOR THIS 👑 KING since the first time he dropped his first album very honest and truthful😍😍💋💕

nicki
nicki
Nov 9, 2019

Great article! Kudos to the photographer as well. I'm a Kevin Gates fan. Let me rephase, i am a fan of Kevin. Thats how he is... he makes u feel like youre on a first name basis. He's so accessible to the people that love him. He may be indifferent, but to me.... he's just different. Again, great piece!

I Gots To Know (Fire Alex Zidel)

Very nice story. Much better than the one you did on the Self-Proclaimed King of the South, HNHH Goldenboy, Virginity Hall Monitor, Crimestoppers T.I.

Rose Lilah
ADMIN
Rose Lilah
Nov 8, 2019

as always...let us know what you think!!

tt5050
tt5050
Nov 8, 2019

I’m not reading all that

kigwe
kigwe
Nov 8, 2019

I think I'm above Kevin Gates

Re'Yonna Anderson

this is an amazingly beautiful article im doing research on kevin for my college paper and this intereview perfectly point out his attributes what a wonderful job you did