As twerking can bring people together, so too can it dismantle a household. With the coronavirus-related quarantine leading to an increase in social media time, much of which has come to include an influx of IG Live sessions, it's no surprise to see that twerking has experienced a one-hundred percent net increase. It didn't take long for the twerk-movement to invade Diddy's recent Easter Sunday Live stream, with Lizzo's sudden indulgence prompting Puff to hit the singer with the swift "cease and desist."

Diddy Lizzo Twerking

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While his at-the-time reasoning for it being "Easter Sunday" and thus no place for ass-gyration made sense on paper, it seemed his rulebook was subsequently tossed out the window during Draya Michele's eventual appearance -- an appearance that found her twerking to Juvenile's "Back Daz Azz Up" without a word said edgewise. The Twitter folk, ever-prone to outrage that they are, slammed Diddy as hypocritical, fat-phobic, and the works. Before long, the narrative had formed and Diddy was forced to confront it head-on. 

As he tells it, Lizzo is one of the greatest twerkers of the age, and he saw nothing inherently wrong with the act itself. He did, however, take issue with the explicit content of her chosen song, and thus moved to keep things as family-friendly as possible.

"There's one thing that I wanna make clear," he moved to clarify. "My queen, my sister, Lizzo, when I stopped the music, it's because it had a lot of curses in there. Not because she was twerking. She's one of the best twerkers in the world, okay? So let's keep that clear. It wasn't about twerking. You're allowed to twerk on Easter. There was a lot of cursing on the record and I don't need child services knocking on my door right now, you understand?"