It certainly much to get sparks flying when Cardi B signs in to Twitter. Late last night, Cardi B tweeted, "I’m just nasty like that," which for some reason was interpreted by her fans as a defensive mechanism. A notable fan and mental health advocate operating under the handle of "Kenidra4Huminty" responded to her post by alluding a level of disappointment in her behavior.

Kenidra tweeted, "I love you ALOT but I don't agree with the messages you've been sending us young girls. So many of us look at you as a role model and that should send a very loud message."

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Cardi B responded to the activist's plea directly by explaining her intentions. She almost admitted that within the past two years, she's been asked to repress her behavior to the point of discomfort - going as far as to convey frustration over the lack of recognition her "model behavior" should be generating, in view of the transformation she's undergone in such a short time. She described her feelings with the following words.

"I been feeling trap and sad cause it’s not ME but everybody tell me to be it for me to be this “rolemodel” and guess what ? People still spit my past right in my face so for now imma be my old self again," Cardi professed in response to Kenidra's concerns.

To her credit, Cardi represents a beacon of realness that is sorely lacking in the age of social media. Although Kenidra's point is well-taken, a great question looms on the horizon. Would the people who look up to Cardi B as a symbol strength prefer even more censorship, or worse, one of those PR-run media accounts. I suspect they'd prefer her to keep at it. Just yesterday, Offsetcame to his wife's defense by professing that Cardi was instrumental in paving the way for female rappers to follow suit. Somebody better page Missy Elliott, MC Lyte and Lil Kim (to name a few) to the discussion before it runs cold.