Blac Chyna and Rob Kardashian have been through some well-documented relationship drama so far this year. When the man best known for being a member of reality TV's most famous family blew up on social media after he caught Chyna in bed with another guy, all hell broke loose. Allegations of physical abuse surfaced from Chyna and hip-hop personalities like T.I. and Tyga, the latter of whom formerly dated another member of the Kardashian clan, chimed in with their own thoughts on the matter. The drama certainly relaxed for a while once custody meetings began, but now TMZ is reporting that there might be a little bit of light at the end of this long, drama-laden tunnel.

Sources familiar with the goings-on say that lawyers from both sides, as well as Rob and Chyna themselves, have been hashing out the details of a joint custody deal for a few months now. The part that looks to be squared away for the most part is the division of physical custody; apparently each is fine giving the other "substantial physical custody." This update is quite the significant one because the Department of Children and Family Services had already opened a case prior to Rob and Chyna's split. Supposedly, drug use was the reason that the documentation was initially pushed through and there's still an open case in L.A. County Dependency Court.

The report also states that Rob believes Chyna "can handle parental responsibilities." However, the rest of his Kardashian siblings do not agree, with serious concerns allegedly coming from them about Chyna's fitness, due in large part to the drug allegations. Then there's the issue of child support. Chyna reportedly wants a lot, a figure that is higher than Rob thinks she deserves, but new developments suggest that there is movement towards a compromise in the works. Whatever agreement is hashed out could sit as an unofficial one for a little while yet, because of that open case in Dependency Court. TMZ clarified that any custody agreement must be signed off by that judge before it can become an iron-clad ruling.