Hip-hop is a genre that encourages collaboration, so it’s no surprise that many great duos have formed throughout the years. Even today, the collaborative album tends to be celebrated upon release, especially if the artists are already proven to have chemistry. As they say, two is often better than one, and many classic albums and songs have been penned by a pair of hands. In celebration of these wonderful meetings of the mind, here are ten of the most iconic duos the game has ever seen.

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Big Boi & Andre 3000

Frederick M. Brown / Getty Images

Frederick M. Brown / Getty Image

The group made up of Big Boi and Andre 3000 have made history as one of music’s quintessential duos. Daddy Fat Saxx and Three Stacks boldly go where few rappers dare explore, constantly evolving their sound on albums like Atliens, Aquemini, and Stankonia. It would be easy to wax poetic on the glories of Outkast, so instead, consume one of their earliest (yet arguably most iconic) bangers. You’d be hard pressed to find a pair of rappers more equally matched, and both Andre and Big Boi have made serious cases for Top 10 status.

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Redman & Method Man

Frank Micelotta / Getty Images

Frank Micelotta / Getty Images

While Redman and Method Man both boast legendary solo careers, together, they’re nigh unstoppable. Their 1999 album Blackout is probably one of the most underrated albums of the nineties, and their chemistry carried over to the film world, blessing us with the cult classic How High. Throw in a top tier live show that leaves even the most established artists scared to follow, and Red and Meth remain one of the game’s most tried and true. Bump “Da Rockwilder” now. It still goes.

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Drake & 40

 Noel Vasquez / Getty Images

Noel Vasquez / Getty Images

While Drake is one of the new generation’s most celebrated voices, 40’s consistent work behind the board has elevated Drizzy’s sound into what it is today. From So Far Gone to More Life, the duo have become one of hip-hop’s most inseparable pairs, and together, they went on to form the OVO empire. With 40’s dark, atmospheric minimalism and Drake’s confessional, honest lyricism, you’d be hard pressed to find a more consistent rapper-producer duo that’s actively crafting bangers.

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Raekwon & Ghostface Killah

Frazer Harrison / Getty Images

Frazer Harrison / Getty Images

These two Wu-Tang veterans both specialize in slang-heavy vernacular and abstract street narratives, so it’s no wonder they work so well together. When Raekwon dropped his debut album Only Built 4 Cuban Linx back in 1995, Ghost was all over it, appearing on twelve out of seventeen tracks. From that moment on, Ghost and Rae emerged as one of the Wu’s most dominant brotherhoods. Not only were they a formidable duo on the mic, but they also stood out as two dudes who would seriously fuck you up if you ever said otherwise. Two of the most underrated storytellers alive.

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Dr. Dre & Snoop Dogg

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Dr. Dre and Snoop Dogg’s catalog runs deep. Pretty much every hip-hop fan has the lyrics of Nothin’ But A G Thang memorized by now, and the run they went on in the early nineties proved influential in shaping the sonic direction of West Coast rap. The hits are endless, and songs like “Fuck With Dre Day,” “Deep Cover,” “What’s My Name,” “Still D.R.E,” “Just Dippin,” “The Next Episode” and “The Wash” prove that Dre and Snoop are one of the most accomplished pairs in hip-hop history. You could, and should, spend hours digging through their catalog.

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El-P & Killer Mike

Emma McIntyre / Getty Images

Emma McIntyre / Getty Images

It’s crazy to think that an underground New York icon and an Outkast protoge from Atlanta would ever cross paths, find common ground, and go on to form one of hip-hop’s most innovative modern duos. Not only are all three of RTJ’s albums certified bangers, but the bromance goes beyond music, culminating in some of the most hilarious interviews out. Despite the seemingly different styles of their respective solo catalogs, Jamie and Mike have managed to kickstart a renaissance, hitting a second wind that most veteran rappers can only dream of. Perhaps their best work is yet to come.

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Jay-Z & Kanye West

Jamie McCarthy / Getty Images

Jamie McCarthy / Getty Images

These self-proclaimed brothers may be in the middle of a family feud, but that shouldn’t tarnish the godlike run of Jay-Z and Kanye West. Looking back at Kanye’s production work on The Blueprint and The Black Album, it’s hard to argue that some of Jay’s best post-2000 material was over Ye beats. Hell, “Lucifer” may very well be in the running for the best Hov song of all time. And then there was Watch The Throne, who used to close out shows playing “N***as In Paris” five times in a row. The sad thing is, it still wasn’t enough.

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Eminem & 50 Cent

Scott Gries / Getty Images

Scott Gries / Getty Images

50 Cent once called Em “his favorite whiteboy” on the stellar “Patiently Waiting.” Since then, the pair have gone on to become close friends and capable collaborators, on songs like “Places To Go,” “Warrior Pt. 2,” “Psycho,” “Never Enough,” “Gatman and Robbin,” and the ominous “I’m Supposed To Die Tonight.” Interestingly enough, Em seemed to bring out 50’s sinister side, and Slim’s minor-key, eerie production often led to some of 50’s most savage work. Recently, Em gave 50 Cent a heartfelt birthday message, stating that the second verse of “Places To Go” made him contemplate quitting rap.

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Jadakiss & Styles P

Phil McCarten / Getty Images

Phil McCarten / Getty Images

While Jadakiss, Styles P, and Sheek Louch team up for an excellent trifecta, there’s something uniquely dope about a Jadakiss and Styles back and forth exchange. For many, this trend emerged on the 2001 classic “We Gon Make It,” which found Jada and P trading deadly quotables like “cause my shells is expensive, you'll know exactly why when you yellin' in intensive.” From that point on, Jadakiss and Styles continued to drop back and forth verses, as well as more traditional, yet equally hard collaborations.

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Malice & Pusha T

 Roger Kisby / Getty Images

Roger Kisby / Getty Images

It’s a shame that Malice and Pusha T eventually parted ways, but at least they blessed us with Lord Willin’ and Hell Hath No Fury before Clipse decided to hang it up. The two Virginia Beach emcees were nigh unstoppable in their prime, crafting literary street narratives over some of The Neptunes’ best production. Tracks like “What Happened To That Boy,” “Comedy Central,” “Mr. Me Too,” and the timeless “Grindin’” are a testament to their longevity, and their contributions to the game helped define the sound of an era.