The Game On Why L.A. Has Outlasted NYC Since The Birth Of Gangsta Rap

Posted by , Oct 9, 2015 at 11:34am

Part 2 of our interview with Game upon the release of "The Documentary 2." Watch as Game explores the difference between L.A. and New York rap, then and now.


The Game dropped his long-awaited sixth studio album, The Documentary 2, today, and in conjunction with the release, we present the second part of our "Documentary 2" interview series, in which Game situates the album within the canon of L.A. gangsta rap. 

Whereas New York might be the "mecca" of hip-hop, Game says L.A., and specifically Compton, is the birthplace of gangsta rap. And, today, L.A. rap is still thriving because guys like Kendrick (and himself) are still rapping with the same no-holds-barred attitude as when N.W.A. first said, "Fuck tha Police." 

"The number one reason L.A. rap has flourished is because, from the beginning, we never had filters. We never gave a fuck about what was politically correct...Snoop taught the world how to crip walk, I taught 'em how to blood bounce, and we never gave a fuck who didn't like it." 

He went on to say that, when he first started rapping, people thought he was from New York, due to his focus on lyricism. Since, Game thinks he has paved the way for some of the world's best L.A.-bred lyricists, including Kendrick Lamar

The rest of the country is still waiting for a worthy competitor to emerge out of NYC, says Game, as the "mecca" hasn't produced a top-quality artist in quite awhile. He mentions French Montana, but says French is not a New York rapper, per se, as his style is, in large part, influenced by the South. 

Check out part 1 of the interview, in which Game details showing Drake around Compton and shooting the "100" video, below. And read our new editorial on Game's new album: "The Game Don't Change: The Making of 'The Documentary 2'." 

Part 2 of our interview with Game upon the release of "The Documentary 2." Watch as Game explores the difference between L.A. and New York rap, then and now.

The Game dropped his long-awaited sixth studio album, The Documentary 2, today, and in conjunction with the release, we present the second part of our "Documentary 2" interview series, in which Game situates the album within the canon of L.A. gangsta rap. 

Whereas New York might be the "mecca" of hip-hop, Game says L.A., and specifically Compton, is the birthplace of gangsta rap. And, today, L.A. rap is still thriving because guys like Kendrick (and himself) are still rapping with the same no-holds-barred attitude as when N.W.A. first said, "Fuck tha Police." 

"The number one reason L.A. rap has flourished is because, from the beginning, we never had filters. We never gave a fuck about what was politically correct...Snoop taught the world how to crip walk, I taught 'em how to blood bounce, and we never gave a fuck who didn't like it." 

He went on to say that, when he first started rapping, people thought he was from New York, due to his focus on lyricism. Since, Game thinks he has paved the way for some of the world's best L.A.-bred lyricists, including Kendrick Lamar

The rest of the country is still waiting for a worthy competitor to emerge out of NYC, says Game, as the "mecca" hasn't produced a top-quality artist in quite awhile. He mentions French Montana, but says French is not a New York rapper, per se, as his style is, in large part, influenced by the South. 

Check out part 1 of the interview, in which Game details showing Drake around Compton and shooting the "100" video, below. And read our new editorial on Game's new album: "The Game Don't Change: The Making of 'The Documentary 2'." 

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