Rittz Talks Coming Up In Atlanta, Being Influenced By Twista

Posted by , Sep 11, 2014 at 12:41pm

HNHH chops it up with Rittz about his new album, "Next To Nothing," growing up in Atlanta and being influenced by Twista and Yelawolf.


Rittz's newly-released album Next To Nothing was a long time coming. The Atlanta native has been hustling in the rap game for years, and finally nabbed a deal with Strange Music for an impressive commercial debut. While on a victory lap promoting the album, Rittz dropped by the HNHH offices in NYC to chat about his career, influences and of course, Next To Nothing. 

First explaining his long locks ("bitches love it") and name (derived from Ritz crackers), Rittz then goes on to describe how it was "hard to get on" as a white rapper after Eminem and Bubba Sparxxx broke out in the early 2000s. That struggle leads Rittz to believe that "if you're a white rapper you should try to be better than the average rapper," and so he ended up taking a ton of influence from the breakneck pacing of rhymes by Twista and Yelawolf, both of whom he managed to nab for features on Next To Nothing.

Be sure to cop Rittz's Strange Music debut on iTunes.

HNHH chops it up with Rittz about his new album, "Next To Nothing," growing up in Atlanta and being influenced by Twista and Yelawolf.

Rittz's newly-released album Next To Nothing was a long time coming. The Atlanta native has been hustling in the rap game for years, and finally nabbed a deal with Strange Music for an impressive commercial debut. While on a victory lap promoting the album, Rittz dropped by the HNHH offices in NYC to chat about his career, influences and of course, Next To Nothing. 

First explaining his long locks ("bitches love it") and name (derived from Ritz crackers), Rittz then goes on to describe how it was "hard to get on" as a white rapper after Eminem and Bubba Sparxxx broke out in the early 2000s. That struggle leads Rittz to believe that "if you're a white rapper you should try to be better than the average rapper," and so he ended up taking a ton of influence from the breakneck pacing of rhymes by Twista and Yelawolf, both of whom he managed to nab for features on Next To Nothing.

Be sure to cop Rittz's Strange Music debut on iTunes.

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