Review: Mac Miller's "Macadelic"

Review: Mac Miller's "Macadelic"

Mac Miller explores new themes over fresh beats on his latest mixtape, "Macadelic."

Mac Miller recently dropped his latest effort, the “Macadelic” mixtape. I haven't really had feelings towards Mac Miller, good or bad; I've enjoyed some of his stuff, but he's not an artist who's in heavy rotation on my iPod. Nonetheless, this was a free tape, so why not give it a listen. 

I enjoyed it more than I anticipated, and I think he went in a slightly different direction content-wise, and maybe even sound-wise, all the while retaining his trademark energy and youthful-persona.

Mac starts off with a little intro before getting into rapping on “Desperado,” which is a good track to start off the tape and set the tone for what's to come. This mixtape is definitely centered around the use of drugs, obvious by the title alone. But, we also see Mac get deep and reflective about life; questioning what it’s all about, and how fame affects him. It goes hand in hand with the drug theme, since one might have these deep meaning-of-life-questions when under the influence.

All the beats are pretty catchy and filled with rich sounds, which makes for a good listening experience when wearing headphones. Miller also has some impressive features, including Lil Wayne, Kendrick Lamar, Juicy J, Cam'ron, Sir Michael Rocks & Casey Veggies.

Sap, the producer who made the hit “Donald Trump,” is back at it on “Thoughts From a Balcony,” which has a completely different feel than the first hit, but still dope. Miller gets pensive with us, asking, “what the fuck is time?”

Miller also addresses his critics throughout this tape, on this particular song he says, “and now these writers taking shots without a Nikon/but I don't fight though, figure it's a typo.” Miller is still  quite young, not even of legal age, so it's only fitting that he has a youthful sound. Ironically, it's this sound that he's been criticized for. Nonetheless, he shows us some growth and maturity on this tape, while still keeping it fresh.

Sir Michael Rocks links up with Miller for the following track, “Aliens Fighting Robots,” which has the typical smooth-feel of a Mikey Rocks joint, and makes for a good collaboration. Then we get into “Vitamins,” which I really liked because Miller tells us a story. What starts off with him going to smoke a joint with a random girl turns into a crazy trip. Miller slurs his flow to go along with the beat and it works. We then get a brief audio clip from “Requiem for a Dream,” which is only fitting, before “Fight The Feeling” with Kendrick Lamar. This joint has a more mellow-vibe, and we get more insight from Mac, when he discusses his own youth and that of his listeners. Mac spits, “When you were young and you just tryna live your life and have some fun/in a world where you have yet to see how evil has become,” His opinion reflects his life as a youth starting out in the game, perhaps unaware of how harsh critics and the general world can be on an adolescent just trying to live.

The banger with Juicy J is back to the fun shit though. “Lucky Ass Bitch” has many drug references, even to coke, which is interesting because in “Loud” Miller says he won't fuck with yeyo. Either way, the production by Lex Luger is on point, with a dope sample. “Ignorant” with Cam'ron is another banger, aptly named; you can definitely get ignorant to it.

“The Question,” featuring Lil Wayne, also has Miller getting contemplative over a smooth jam. Miller thanks God that he doesn't have health problems, but it doesn't mean he doesn't have problems period. I think this is something young listeners can relate too-- your own problems may be trivialized by other people, even if to you they are everything.

All in all, Miller gives us an enjoyable tape, which gives off feel-good vibes even when the content is darker. He goes well over most of the lush beats, the only one I don't like his flow on is the Clams Casino-produced “Angel.”

In this latest release, Mac shows us that he's not just about the new clothes, money and drugs; he also gives us some emotional content. Production from ID Labs dominates, but their vibes are definitely suitable for “Macadelic.”

Cop the mixtape here if you haven't had a chance to check it out.

 

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