Posted by , Aug 18, 2015 at 06:27pm
EDITOR RATING
77%
Golden: 4Broken: 0
Unanimous
AUDIENCE RATING
78%
133 votes
Editor reviews (tap to expand)
80%
Alex Galbraith
Tre Stays TRU
2 Chainz doesn't deviate much from the Trap-A-Velli formula, giving us just enough newness to keep things interesting.
153
75%
Patrick Lyons
Consistent, with a few gems
Like most 2 Chainz releases, "Trap-A-Velli Tre" doesn't have many bad tracks, but includes a few that you may skip over on repeat listens. What elevates this specific one, though, is a second-half stretch that includes some of his finest, weirdest work. You'd be hard-pressed to find a better three-song run than "GOAT," "Halo Letter From My Unborn Son" and "Big Meech Era."
74
75%
Rose Lilah
2 Chainz takes it back real quick
Nothing overtly new or inventive here, just 2 Chainz being 2 Chainz. A few strange-but-hilarious one-liners as well as some very weird song concepts ("Halo Letter"???), but I couldn't ask for much more from the third instalment in the Trapavelli mixtape series.
513
77%
Trevor Smith
1.5 Chainz out of 2
To me, 2 Chainz is at his best when he takes things widescreen, as he did on the criminally underrated "BOATS II". His subsequent EP, "Freebase" took that ambition and added a surprisingly effective experimental edge to the production. "Trapavelli Tre" feels a little more low-stakes, which -- as a free project -- it should. The tape puts Tity back into singles mode, with the adventurous ear of "Freebase" showing up in sporadic bursts. It's exactly what Chainz needs to build hype for LP3.
105
User  Rating:
hottttt
78% (133)
Rate it!
audience rating
75 VERY HOTTTTT
28 HOTTTTT
12 MEH
7 NOT FEELING IT
11 MAKE IT STOP
User Rating:
78% (133)
More of the same from 2 Chainz, and that's okay by us.

At this point in the Trap-A-Velli mixtape series (and this point in the unkillable career of 2 Chainz) we definitely know what to expect from any new releases.

These are street-leaning tapes with knocking beats. 2 Chainz alternates between acting as the M.C.; keeping the procession of sub-woofer-celebrating productions rolling smooth, and the heckler; taking the air out of what could be an overly serious crackhouse odyssey with throwaway jokes as likely to make you groan as they will make you laugh.

A great example of this comes early on in the tape with the song “Watch Out,” where Chainz seamlessly transitions from a sit-down with Louis Farrakhan to a chorus of “Watch out, lil’ bitch/ you gettin’ mad/ I’m gettin’ rich.”

The most promising thing about Trap-A-Velli Tre is that 2 Chainz is still able to make mixtapes like this after finding mainstream fame. There’s little here that’s trying to court the radio, not a Chris Brown or Ty Dolla $ign collaboration in sight. The most mainstream thing about Trap-A-Velli Tre is the frontloading of all the singles. The first six tracks are clearly made for the casual listener (featuring a who’s who of trap producers from Nard & B to Zaytoven), and the album takes a weird detour from that point.

There’s “I Feel Like,” a genre exercise that answers a question no one has ever asked: “What if Tity Boi was from Houston?” Strangely enough, 2 Chainz's typically jubilant delivery works even when it’s buried in the syrupy, JRPG-remix production.

He follows that with an ultra-slow and uncharacteristically mellow collaboration with The-Dream ("Goat") and a pitch-shifted track delivered from the point of view of a fetus, "Halo (Letter From My Unborn Son)." The two back-to-back represent some of the strangest work that 2 Chainz has ever done. Especially the latter, which would sound more at home on a Lil B or MFDoom tape than the third instalment of Trap-A-Velli.

It can’t be overstated that the centerpiece of 2 Chainz trapping mixtape is a track delivered in chipmunk-voice from what’s supposed to be a pissed-off, unborn child. 2 Chainz is an entertainer in the truest sense, though, so he returns to the crowd-pleasers shortly thereafter.

“If I Didn’t Rap” is an examination of what Tity would do without his current career (for a hint, take a second look at the mixtape title). "El Chapo Jr." is a goofy track comparing Chainz to the notorious cartel leader over a Latin-leaning piano beat. “Lapdance In The Traphouse” is a song that’s so 2 Chainz, it’s almost parody. “Each And Erry One Of Em” is by far the most forgettable track on the whole tape, especially you’ve heard 2 Chainz schtick 14 times. Keep trying to get Cap 1 off the ground, Chainz. It’s going to happen eventually.

As if to remind the listener that he has the capability to step outside the trap, Chainz ends the album with a baby-bottom soft collaboration with Betty Idol. “Blue Dolphin” could be a SNL short playing 2 Chainz against type over easy-listening music, if he wasn’t 100% serious.  It’s the only indication on the album that having the Hair Weave Killa leave his comfort zone doesn’t always work.

Overall, Trapavelli Tre is exactly what we want from 2 Chainz: a bunch of trunk rattlers and trap tales with just enough originality thrown in to keep us on our toes.

Review: 2 Chainz' "Trapavelli Tre"

 
77%

Editor rating

Golden: 4 Broken: 0
Unanimous

Audience rating

133 votes
78 %

Editor Rating

80%
Alex Galbraith Tre Stays TRU
2 Chainz doesn't deviate much from the Trap-A-Velli formula, giving us just enough newness to keep things interesting.
153
75%
Patrick Lyons Consistent, with a few gems
Like most 2 Chainz releases, "Trap-A-Velli Tre" doesn't have many bad tracks, but includes a few that you may skip over on repeat listens. What elevates this specific one, though, is a second-half stretch that includes some of his finest, weirdest work. You'd be hard-pressed to find a better three-song run than "GOAT," "Halo Letter From My Unborn Son" and "Big Meech Era."
74
75%
Rose Lilah 2 Chainz takes it back real quick
Nothing overtly new or inventive here, just 2 Chainz being 2 Chainz. A few strange-but-hilarious one-liners as well as some very weird song concepts ("Halo Letter"???), but I couldn't ask for much more from the third instalment in the Trapavelli mixtape series.
513
77%
Trevor Smith 1.5 Chainz out of 2
To me, 2 Chainz is at his best when he takes things widescreen, as he did on the criminally underrated "BOATS II". His subsequent EP, "Freebase" took that ambition and added a surprisingly effective experimental edge to the production. "Trapavelli Tre" feels a little more low-stakes, which -- as a free project -- it should. The tape puts Tity back into singles mode, with the adventurous ear of "Freebase" showing up in sporadic bursts. It's exactly what Chainz needs to build hype for LP3.
105

Audience Rating

How do you rate this album/mixtape?
User  Rating:
audience rating
75 VERY HOTTTTT
28 HOTTTTT
12 MEH
7 NOT FEELING IT
11 MAKE IT STOP
 

More of the same from 2 Chainz, and that's okay by us.


At this point in the Trap-A-Velli mixtape series (and this point in the unkillable career of 2 Chainz) we definitely know what to expect from any new releases.

These are street-leaning tapes with knocking beats. 2 Chainz alternates between acting as the M.C.; keeping the procession of sub-woofer-celebrating productions rolling smooth, and the heckler; taking the air out of what could be an overly serious crackhouse odyssey with throwaway jokes as likely to make you groan as they will make you laugh.

A great example of this comes early on in the tape with the song “Watch Out,” where Chainz seamlessly transitions from a sit-down with Louis Farrakhan to a chorus of “Watch out, lil’ bitch/ you gettin’ mad/ I’m gettin’ rich.”

The most promising thing about Trap-A-Velli Tre is that 2 Chainz is still able to make mixtapes like this after finding mainstream fame. There’s little here that’s trying to court the radio, not a Chris Brown or Ty Dolla $ign collaboration in sight. The most mainstream thing about Trap-A-Velli Tre is the frontloading of all the singles. The first six tracks are clearly made for the casual listener (featuring a who’s who of trap producers from Nard & B to Zaytoven), and the album takes a weird detour from that point.

There’s “I Feel Like,” a genre exercise that answers a question no one has ever asked: “What if Tity Boi was from Houston?” Strangely enough, 2 Chainz's typically jubilant delivery works even when it’s buried in the syrupy, JRPG-remix production.

He follows that with an ultra-slow and uncharacteristically mellow collaboration with The-Dream ("Goat") and a pitch-shifted track delivered from the point of view of a fetus, "Halo (Letter From My Unborn Son)." The two back-to-back represent some of the strangest work that 2 Chainz has ever done. Especially the latter, which would sound more at home on a Lil B or MFDoom tape than the third instalment of Trap-A-Velli.

It can’t be overstated that the centerpiece of 2 Chainz trapping mixtape is a track delivered in chipmunk-voice from what’s supposed to be a pissed-off, unborn child. 2 Chainz is an entertainer in the truest sense, though, so he returns to the crowd-pleasers shortly thereafter.

“If I Didn’t Rap” is an examination of what Tity would do without his current career (for a hint, take a second look at the mixtape title). "El Chapo Jr." is a goofy track comparing Chainz to the notorious cartel leader over a Latin-leaning piano beat. “Lapdance In The Traphouse” is a song that’s so 2 Chainz, it’s almost parody. “Each And Erry One Of Em” is by far the most forgettable track on the whole tape, especially you’ve heard 2 Chainz schtick 14 times. Keep trying to get Cap 1 off the ground, Chainz. It’s going to happen eventually.

As if to remind the listener that he has the capability to step outside the trap, Chainz ends the album with a baby-bottom soft collaboration with Betty Idol. “Blue Dolphin” could be a SNL short playing 2 Chainz against type over easy-listening music, if he wasn’t 100% serious.  It’s the only indication on the album that having the Hair Weave Killa leave his comfort zone doesn’t always work.

Overall, Trapavelli Tre is exactly what we want from 2 Chainz: a bunch of trunk rattlers and trap tales with just enough originality thrown in to keep us on our toes.

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