Posted by , Jun 17, 2016 at 05:26pm
Producer Brandon Parrott believes that Dr. Dre and 50 Cent pimped him out of any money on "P.I.M.P.", the 2003 "Get Rich or Die Tryin'" single.

50 Cent and Dr. Dre are now being sued over "P.I.M.P," one of a handful of classic tracks off 50's Get Rich or Die Tryin', released via Aftermath Entertainment. The "P.I.M.P." production credits go to Mr. Porter and Brandon Parrott, the latter whom apparently never got paid for the now-Gold certified track. Well, he did sign some sort of settlement deal upon the track's release, but he's now asserting that Aftermath basically stole his track and then framed it as an "honest mistake," reports TMZ

Back in 2001, about two years before the release of Get Rich or Die Tryin', Parrott claims that he sent Dr. Dre 10 beats with the hope that the Aftermath boss would be interested in placing them with some of his label's artists. Not only was the pack opened, but one of its beats (called "BAMBA," says Parrott) ended up being used on "P.I.M.P." 

Shortly before Get Rich or Die Tryin' would hit retailers, Parrott alleges that he received a call from an undisclosed Aftermath producer, perhaps Mr. Porter, who told him that his track ("BAMBA") had ended up on the final edit of "P.I.M.P." Said producer apparently had no idea that Parrott's work had been used in the song, which was released as a single six months after GRODT's release. 

Parrott admits that he initially believed the story that was told to him -- that it was wholly accidental that his production was incorporated into a 50 Cent song. And because it was an "honest mistake," he agreed to sign a settlement deal. 

Now, however, Parrott claims to have heard interviews that prove that the beat-jacking wasn't accidental, implying that Aftermath deliberately tried to manipulate him. His settlement deal presumably didn't earn him the amount of money that he's entitled to as one of the song's producers, so he's now fighting to claim his lost royalties. As TMZ reports that Dre and 50 (and not Porter) are the targets of the lawsuit, it would seem that the interview evidence Parrott speaks of involves the two of them. The amount of the lawsuit is not yet known. 

And if you don't care about this story at all, at least take the time to bump the tried-and-true classic below.  

Producer Claims Dr. Dre & 50 Cent Deliberately Cut Him Out Of "P.I.M.P." Money

Producer Brandon Parrott believes that Dr. Dre and 50 Cent pimped him out of any money on "P.I.M.P.", the 2003 "Get Rich or Die Tryin'" single.


50 Cent and Dr. Dre are now being sued over "P.I.M.P," one of a handful of classic tracks off 50's Get Rich or Die Tryin', released via Aftermath Entertainment. The "P.I.M.P." production credits go to Mr. Porter and Brandon Parrott, the latter whom apparently never got paid for the now-Gold certified track. Well, he did sign some sort of settlement deal upon the track's release, but he's now asserting that Aftermath basically stole his track and then framed it as an "honest mistake," reports TMZ

Back in 2001, about two years before the release of Get Rich or Die Tryin', Parrott claims that he sent Dr. Dre 10 beats with the hope that the Aftermath boss would be interested in placing them with some of his label's artists. Not only was the pack opened, but one of its beats (called "BAMBA," says Parrott) ended up being used on "P.I.M.P." 

Shortly before Get Rich or Die Tryin' would hit retailers, Parrott alleges that he received a call from an undisclosed Aftermath producer, perhaps Mr. Porter, who told him that his track ("BAMBA") had ended up on the final edit of "P.I.M.P." Said producer apparently had no idea that Parrott's work had been used in the song, which was released as a single six months after GRODT's release. 

Parrott admits that he initially believed the story that was told to him -- that it was wholly accidental that his production was incorporated into a 50 Cent song. And because it was an "honest mistake," he agreed to sign a settlement deal. 

Now, however, Parrott claims to have heard interviews that prove that the beat-jacking wasn't accidental, implying that Aftermath deliberately tried to manipulate him. His settlement deal presumably didn't earn him the amount of money that he's entitled to as one of the song's producers, so he's now fighting to claim his lost royalties. As TMZ reports that Dre and 50 (and not Porter) are the targets of the lawsuit, it would seem that the interview evidence Parrott speaks of involves the two of them. The amount of the lawsuit is not yet known. 

And if you don't care about this story at all, at least take the time to bump the tried-and-true classic below.  

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