Mick Jenkins Feat. BADBADNOTGOOD "Drowning" Video

Posted by , Aug 25, 2016 at 07:37pm

Mick Jenkins rises above water in the stunning video to "Drowning," a new collab with BADBADNOTGOOD off his upcoming album, "The Healing Component."


Mick Jenkins has unveiled his new single, "Drowning," via an arresting new music video, in which he plays a runaway slave. The song, which will appear on his upcoming debut album, The Healing Component, is a collaboration with the Toronto band BADBADNOTGOOD, who worked with Jenkins recently on their own track "Hyssop of Love." 

"Drowning" begins with a sparse and slow instrumental of just bass and what sounds like a tin can. Jenkins sings for most of the record, which sounds more like old-style blues than hip-hop. Even though he exercises a hushed tone, there's a stunning vigor about his voice. He does begin to rap about three minutes into the song, and it becomes clear that his skill as an emcee is still his greatest asset. What a verse. There's so much to unpack, but "Drowning" is the type of song one has to deeply feel before jumping to any analysis. 

Once Jenkins discovers how to stop flailing underwater, he rises back to the surface in order to save his fellow slaves. They eventually have the chance to exact retribution on their once-masters, though they opt to teach them a lesson in the art of floatation instead. 

You can pre-order The Healing Component beginning tonight at midnight (08/26). 

Mick Jenkins rises above water in the stunning video to "Drowning," a new collab with BADBADNOTGOOD off his upcoming album, "The Healing Component."

Mick Jenkins has unveiled his new single, "Drowning," via an arresting new music video, in which he plays a runaway slave. The song, which will appear on his upcoming debut album, The Healing Component, is a collaboration with the Toronto band BADBADNOTGOOD, who worked with Jenkins recently on their own track "Hyssop of Love." 

"Drowning" begins with a sparse and slow instrumental of just bass and what sounds like a tin can. Jenkins sings for most of the record, which sounds more like old-style blues than hip-hop. Even though he exercises a hushed tone, there's a stunning vigor about his voice. He does begin to rap about three minutes into the song, and it becomes clear that his skill as an emcee is still his greatest asset. What a verse. There's so much to unpack, but "Drowning" is the type of song one has to deeply feel before jumping to any analysis. 

Once Jenkins discovers how to stop flailing underwater, he rises back to the surface in order to save his fellow slaves. They eventually have the chance to exact retribution on their once-masters, though they opt to teach them a lesson in the art of floatation instead. 

You can pre-order The Healing Component beginning tonight at midnight (08/26). 

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