Review: Jay-Z's "Magna Carta Holy Grail"

In a ground-breaking partnership with Samsung, Brooklyn rapper Jay-Z rewrites the rules of the game with the release of his highly anticipated solo album "Magna Carta Holy Grail."

    Review: Lloyd Banks' "F.N.O. (Failure's No Option)"
    Lloyd Banks' pedigree as an ill emcee speaks for itself at this point. During G-Unit’s active days, Banks was widely considered the best pure spitter in the group. Very little has changed in that regard; if anything Banks' career since the early 2000s has distinguished him as one of the most technically savvy rappers out. F.N.O. (Failure's No Option) only makes it easier to argue the case.
    Review: Game's "Jesus Piece"
    Though he did fall off the map for a while, fans will remember 2012 as the year Game made his triumphant comeback. First, he released The R.E.D Album to critical acclaim and followed that up with the recent release of Jesus Piece - an album that could go down as one of Game's best.
    Review: Sir Michael Rocks "BANCO"
    As a member of the Cool Kids, Sir Michael Rocks helped pioneer the current “cool kid” rap and fashion swag, since borrowed by a number of your favorite artists. They were the next big thing, even featured in a nationally aired Rhapsody commercial, with future star Sara Bareilles.
    Review: Juicy J's "Stay Trippy"
    Few rappers get a second life in the rap game. It’s nearly unheard of to lap around the competition a third time around. But then again Juicy J is not the typical rapper. He started out with his fellow Memphis native rappers and friends DJ Paul and Lord Infamous to form Three 6 Mafia in the early 90’s.
    Review: Royce da 5’9" and DJ Premier’s "PRhyme"
    When Royce da 5’9” and DJ Premier announced that they’d be making an entire project together, hip-hop heads everywhere got excited. Premier is a legendary figure in hip-hop and Royce is widely revered for his ability to spit quality bars. With three years having passed since Royce’s last project, he’s still managed to remain active with work related to Slaughterhouse and Shady.
    Review: Action Bronson's "Mr. Wonderful"
    Action Bronson’s new album is a bid to be considered the funniest man in hip hop. A week after Kendrick Lamar’s album has the entire culture debating race, politics, and society, Mr. Wonderful reminds us that sometimes rap can also be about wicked-funny punch lines and ridiculous one-liners as much as it can attempt to impact culture itself.
    Review: Freddie Gibbs' "ESGN"
    Freddie Gibbs is a veteran in the rap game but it’s taken him a decade to put out his first studio album. Cutting his teeth on the mixtape circuit, Gibbs released a steady stream of solid projects rife with stories of the drug game. After signing with Interscope Records, Gibbs was shuffled to the back of the bus before being dropped altogether.
    Review: Soulja Boy's "Life After Fame"
    July 30th approached quickly for Soulja Boy. Originally announced as an album, Life After Fame arrived at its release date with little to no hype. Instead of pushing the album back, the “Crank That” rapper delivered a nineteen-track mixtape with zero features. Recent singles “We Ready” and “Ridin’ Round” are nowhere to be found on the tracklist.
    Review: Childish Gambino's "Because The Internet"
    Originality is a rarity in modern hip-hop, and when an experimental album comes along, it tends to polarize listeners initially. Take Kanye West's new album Yeezus, for example. Its minimalism, raw emotion and amalgamation of genres was difficult for many diehard fans to stomach at first (not to mention the left-field visuals).
    Review: DJ Khaled's "Suffering From Success"
    DJ Khaled has been behind some of the hottest records of the last few years and if there's one thing he's made consistently clear it's that he has a winning formula for hits. This is also his greatest fault. It's never been so clear how one dimensional DJ Khaled's music really is than here on Suffering From Success, the DJ's seventh studio album.
    Review: J. Cole's "Born Sinner"
    Cole World: The Sideline Story was considered somewhat of a disappointment to fans who really knew the raw talent that J. Cole posseses. The storyteller and the street smart rapper that fans loved was missing in his debut album. This time around Cole delivers a more cohesive project, with tracks easily flowing one by one to create a complete concept: Born Sinner.
    Review: Wu-Tang Clan's "A Better Tomorrow"
    It's been seven years since the Wu-Tang Clan released their last proper album, 8 Diagrams, but of course, that doesn’t mean the members of rap’s greatest clan have been prepping for an early retirement. Not by a long shot. 
    Review: Future’s “Pluto”
    It would be lazy, bordering on irresponsible, to run with the “future of rap” motif when looking at the hotly anticipated debut LP from Atlanta’s, Future.  Fact is, the latest in a long line of talented ATL rappers, has a sound that’s not so much futuristic, as it is transcendent.
    Review: Snoop Lion's "Reincarnated"
    2012 was an eye-opening year for Snoop Dogg. So much so that the West Coast rapper held a press conference in July to publicly announce that, after spending some time in the Caribbean island of Jamaica, he was a changed man. Snoop declared he was leaving the gangsta-image alone to adopt the ways and culture of a Rastafarian.
    Review: Lil Wayne's "I Am Not A Human Being II"
    Lil Wayne has always differentiated himself from us mere mortals, something he clearly set out to prove again with I Am Not A Human Being II, his tenth (and possibly final) studio album. He's explored the outer limits of the rap game with this one, bringing fellow rappers 2 Chainz, Nicki Minaj, Drake and Future along for the ride.IANAHB2 is the sequel to Weezy’s 2009 album of the sa
    Review: Ty Dolla $ign's "Beach House" EP
    With the recent release of his EP Beach House, Ty Dolla $ign has been on our radar for a while. The West Coast rapper, responsible for producing and writing the hit “Toot It And Boot It” for YG, has since made a name for himself through two successful mixtapes, Beach House and Beach House 2.
    Review: The-Dream's "Royalty: The Prequel" EP
    The North Carolina-born and Georgia raised singer-songwriter and producer set out to pay homage to hip hop and his Southern roots on the follow up to his 2013 album, IV Play. Sonically, more like the follow up to his first free release, 1977, which was released under his government name, Terius Nash in 2011 and rereleased by Def Jam for commercial sale the following year.
    Review: Trae Tha Truth's "I Am King"
    Signing to T.I.'s Grand Hustle label has been a stroke of good fortune for Trae Tha Truth. The Houston rapper's career has unfortunately been plagued by the loss of some his closest friends, shootings and controversy with radio executives. Despite this, he's continued to make music and does a commendable job on this new 20-track tape.
    Review: Trinidad James' "10 Pc. Mild"
    2012’s Don’t Be S.A.F.E. flew under the radar for the hip-hop masses. Aside from smash hits “Female$ Welcomed” and “All Gold Everything”, nobody quite knew the true identity of Trinidad James. Many eyebrows were raised when James inked a deal with Def Jam worth $2 million. Skeptics argued that he would be a one-hit wonder, and fail to live up to expectations.
    Review: Chief Keef's "Almighty So"
    "They want that old Sosa… for what doe?" Well, for good reason. Chief Keef ran into some icebergs with Bang Pt. 2, and the ship continues to sink. The same qualities that were present on his last mixtape reappear on Almighty So. Poor mixing and sloppy delivery continue to cloud the highlights. Thankfully the beats were banging, or else this mixtape would have been a lot worse.
    Review: Wiz Khalifa's "Cabin Fever 2"
    It only seems appropriate that Wiz would treat us to some of his new sounds, giving us a taste of what to expect on O.N.I.F.C. Full of chilled out, smoking vibes and plenty of party anthems, Cabin Fever 2 resembles a chilled bottle of Bombay Sapphire that sprouted legs and just walked out of the champagne room with a joint in hand.
    Review: Lil Wayne's "Dedication 5"
    There was a time not too long ago when Lil Wayne was widely considered the best rapper alive. Since 2009's No Ceilings, Lil Tunechi has left fans scratching their heads and wondering what happened to the once dominant Mixtape Weezy. All that mediocrity recently caught up to the Young Money star. Tunechi wasn't nominated for this year's MTV VMAs or the BET Awards.
    Review: Dizzy Wright’s “The Golden Age”
    After a number of impressive leaks, Dizzy Wright, drops his highly anticipated mixtape, The Golden Age. This is the Sin City representative's fifth street album in total, the tape is the follow-up to the free version of SmokeOut Conversations, which was released in June 2012, and comes on the heels of last December's Booth-hosted The First Agreement EP.
    Review: Chris Brown's  "X" Album
    Sometimes one song can set the precedence for an album’s entirety and Chris Brown’s opening title-track, X does just that. The Diplo-produced, hip-hop/EDM comprised record symbolizes Brown’s back and forth attempt at being an R&B, hip-hop, pop and dance music star.The song starts off slow and then builds up to an uptempo dance record filled with egotistical lyrics.
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