Review: Teyana Taylor's "VII"
    We first heard from the young Harlemite in 2008 when she released her first single, “Google Me,” from her debut project, a mixtape titled From a Planet Called Harlem. The Jazze Pha-produced single sank low on the Billboard charts and left Teyana Taylor with something to prove.
    Review: Rittz's "Next To Nothing"
    It's no secret that hip-hop at large is lacking in original content. If the music isn't about money, it's about sex; if it's not about sex, it's about who's the hardest (no pun intended); if not who's hardest, it's about hip-hop itself. It's in this musical landscape that a label like Tech N9ne's Strange Music is needed the most.
    Review: Smoke DZA's "Dream.ZONE.Achieve"
    Smoke DZA fans have seen the Harlem rapper’s growth from his last few projects. He went from hard-hitting straight-laced lyrics in George Kush Da Button to a street storyteller in Rugby Thompson. Back with the long awaited and highly anticipated Dream.ZONE.Achieve, DZA sets out to prove that he has a lot more to talk about than just marijuana.
    Review: SBTRKT "Wonder Where We Land"
    SBTRKT took the world by storm with his first LP. Released at the base of the alternative R&B explosion, the album perfectly blended dance music and soul, even catching the eye of Drake and inspiring him to drop a verse on "Wildfire," which in turn became more popular than the original (but that's every day for Drake). How will SBTRKT's second album stack up to the first one?
    Review: Raekwon's "Fly International Luxurious Art"
    It’s tough to get 100 percent behind the Wu-Tang Clan these days. No one can deny their influence and run of classic records in the 90s, but drama, stylistic confusion, and album delays have plagued the crew for the past half-decade.
    Review: Xzibit's "Napalm"
    News flash, Xzibit doesn’t just pimp rides. Every now and then when X wants to he has proven he can spit, and this was very apparent at this years BET Awards show. His verse at the BET Cypher this year was nothing short of memorable, and his album follows suit.Napalm is X’s first commercial attempt since his last studio album Full Circle, which was released in 2006.
    Review: Lucki Eck$' "X"
    Lucki Eck$ is one of the more interesting figures in today's rap scene. He may not have a "Trap Queen" under his belt, but with a unique sound, a few solid mixtapes, and no shortage of music videos, the 19-year-old rapper has built an image that his devoted fanbase can't get enough of. 
    Review: Freddie Gibbs' "ESGN"
    Freddie Gibbs is a veteran in the rap game but it’s taken him a decade to put out his first studio album. Cutting his teeth on the mixtape circuit, Gibbs released a steady stream of solid projects rife with stories of the drug game. After signing with Interscope Records, Gibbs was shuffled to the back of the bus before being dropped altogether.
    Review: The-Dream's "Royalty: The Prequel" EP
    The North Carolina-born and Georgia raised singer-songwriter and producer set out to pay homage to hip hop and his Southern roots on the follow up to his 2013 album, IV Play. Sonically, more like the follow up to his first free release, 1977, which was released under his government name, Terius Nash in 2011 and rereleased by Def Jam for commercial sale the following year.
    Review: Vado's "Sinatra EP"
    For Vado, Sinatra represents much more than just another one of the several tapes he has dropped over the past few years. The smooth flowing Harlem representer is in the midst of a crucial part of his rap career. The Dipset affiliate went from NYC --> MIA to link up with DJ Khaled and in 2013 he signed with Khaled's We the Best label.
    Review: ScHoolboy Q "Habits & Contradictions"
    Schoolboy Q dropped his latest project, “Habits & Contradictions” via iTunes, asking $7.99 for it. It was definitely worth the almost-eight bucks! This latest work show his growth as an artist since “Setbacks,” it displays his versatile flow and his ear for a unique beat.
    Review: Ghostface Killah's "36 Seasons"
    Ghostface Killah’s new LP 36 Seasons comes to us just one week after the release of Wu-Tang Clan’s A Better Tomorrow. While the latter LP received lukewarm reviews due to questionably experimental tracks, 36 Seasons is the exact opposite. It is concise and precise, using that classic Wu sound to march along an incredible story line while The Revelations provide the production.
    Review: Joey Fatt's "Ill Street Blues"
    Straight out of Long Beach, CA, Joey Fatts is the epitome of a rapper from the streets. He tells his story of being raised in the same neighborhood that was home to hip hop legends Snoop Dogg and Nate Dogg on Ill Streets Blues. Similar to them, he is able to inspire and motivate with lyrics that detail the hard work, dedication, and heart necessary to make it out of the streets.
    Review: Prodigy's "The Bumpy Johnson Album"
    It hasn't been too long since we've heard from the other Mobb Deep member, Prodigy, who just released an album in July, but he's back again with his second release post-prison. There has been a lot of talk about Prodigy lately, regarding the controversy surrounding his relationship with the other half of Mobb Deep, Havoc. This time around though
    Review: Ace Hood's "Starvation 3"
    If the first Starvation mixtape proved to be a metaphor for Ace Hood’s unmitigated hunger for the level of super stardom usually reserved for rappers like his friend, Lil Wayne, then Starvation 3 makes Ace Hood sound as hungry as ever, except this time around, the production values are a lot better.
    Review: Ty Dolla $ign's "Beach House" EP
    With the recent release of his EP Beach House, Ty Dolla $ign has been on our radar for a while. The West Coast rapper, responsible for producing and writing the hit “Toot It And Boot It” for YG, has since made a name for himself through two successful mixtapes, Beach House and Beach House 2.
    Review: Chief Keef's "Almighty So"
    "They want that old Sosa… for what doe?" Well, for good reason. Chief Keef ran into some icebergs with Bang Pt. 2, and the ship continues to sink. The same qualities that were present on his last mixtape reappear on Almighty So. Poor mixing and sloppy delivery continue to cloud the highlights. Thankfully the beats were banging, or else this mixtape would have been a lot worse.
    Review: The Weeknd's "Kiss Land"
    Fame is a helluva drug for any celebrity. For some, it's a way of giving voice to a worthy cause. For others, it's a license to do and say whatever they feel or pursue any artistic path they choose. With The Weeknd, fame could be downright scary.
    Review: Fabolous' "Soul Tape 3" Mixtape
    In November, Atlanta rapper Trinidad James caused a firestorm with comments he made while performing in Brooklyn, New York City. After multiple rappers (most notably Maino) called him out for stating that ATL rappers run NYC musically, the Def Jam signee finally admitted he chose the wrong venue.
    Review: Drake's "Nothing Was The Same"
    “Prince Akeem, they throw flowers at my feet, nigga!” Drake declares in the intro of his third album. In 2009, he released the highly-acclaimed So Far Gone mixtape and since then the half Jewish, half Black kid from Canada has gone on sell millions of records, sell out concerts, become insanely rich and currently holds the title for most number one songs on the Billboard rap charts.
    Review: Eminem's "Marshall Mathers LP 2"
    The Marshall Mathers LP dropped in 2000 and became the fastest selling solo album of all time, influencing a whole generation of artists with its unique and in-depth look into the bizarre world of Eminem. The album was sandwiched in between Slim Shady LP and The Eminem Show – two other classic albums that are every bit as influential today as they were a decade ago.
    Review: The Underachievers' "The Lords Of Flatbush"
    Following the earlier release of their debut project Indigoism this year The Underachievers are back with a solid new mixtape, The Lords of Flatbush reasserting their undeniable spot in the Beast Coast movement.
    Review: French Montana's "Coke Boys 4"
    In a way, Coke Boys 4 is exactly what was expected. Plenty of features, varied production, and a heavy supply of trunk bangers make this a typical French Montana project. This time around, OTF rapper Lil Durk was notably involved after recently joining forces with the Coke Boy family. Even with Durk's contributions, however, the mixtape lacks originality.
    Review: Jhene Aiko's "Sail Out"
    Stunning. If Jhene Aiko wasn't already a household name, she ought to be by now. The 25-year-old singer has appeared on numerous hip-hop tracks throughout the year, most notably Drake's "From Time", J. Cole's "Sparks Will Fly", and Big Sean’s radio smash "Beware". Sail Out* is Jhene’s first major label EP, and what a debut it is.
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